Home Ammunition

Ammunition

Ammunition At A Glance

Ammunition At A Glance

There is much heated debate regarding the Second Amendment of the Bill of Rights in the United States. The opposing sides, those who want gun rights, and those who want gun control, are currently engaged in a battle of political wit and words that has been in a perpetual stalemate since the whole thing began. 
Regardless of political allegiance, the fact is that there are rules and regulations currently in place by federal and state laws regarding firearms. This is also expanded to include firearm ammunition as well. The most controversial and often debated types of ammunition are armor piercing bullets and hollow tip or hollow point bullets. Some states have already taken proper measure to prohibit and outlaw armor piercing ammunition.
Hollow points, while not legally barred, as still the subject of debate by people defending the stance that they are safer than ordinary bullets, while those attacking the aspect that they cause more harm when used on people and animals. 

Ammunition Background Overview

Ammunition Background OverviewThe term ammunition, at least in speaking terms,
generally is thought to refer to bullets.  Bullets are the projectiles
that fire out of guns, and are what can be considered as the most dangerous
part of a weapon.  However, the term and the meanings behind the word
ammunition are more complex than can be concluded without proper
examination.  Ammunition, also known as ammo, does in fact refer to the
projectiles that are fired from firearms.  However, the term has grown and
expanded to include various other types of projectiles, some that are much more
advanced than bullets; anything that can be used in combat can also be included
in the word when used in a collective sense.  The word ammunition derives
from the French term munition, which
referred to all items used in war.  As time progress, the term became
specifically tied to gun power and artillery applications.  In order to
understand how ammunition encompasses so many aspects of firearms and
artillery, it is  imperative to understand ammunition at one its most
basic modern forms, the bullet.

The bullet is a projectile fired out, in this specific purpose, out a gun or
firearm.  The bullet itself does contain any explosive elements, such as
gun powder, but technically speaking, it is part of a cartridge that actually
hits an intended target.  What most people will commonly refer to as a
bullet is, technical terms, the cartridge; the bullet is the projectile
itself.  A cartridge consists of several parts.  The bullet, as
explained, is the projective, and is the top of a cartridge.  The
following section is called the case, which holds all of the cartridges
components in place.  Inside the casing, the propellant, which powers the
bullet, is contained within.  The propellant is usually gun powder, or in
more modern times, cordite.  The rim is part of the casing which is used
for the actual loading of the cartridge itself.  Lastly, the primer is the
component that ignites the propellant, is powered by the gun’s firing
pin.  For the purpose of small or conventional firearms, such as shotguns,
rifles, and handguns, a collection of cartridges may be referred as ammunition,
and often stored in ammunition boxes.  Each particular type of firearm has
a specific size cartridge that is needed in order for the weapon to function
properly.  The size of the cartridge commonly referred to as a caliber
size.  Caliber size actually refers to the diameter of the cartridge, but
length is also important when specifying the proper and necessary ammunition
for a particular firearm.  Cartridges are usually made out of brass, but
may also be made of steel, because of its affordability.  The cartridge is
today’s most basic form of ammunition, but as history shows,  ammunition
referred to projectiles used in cannons and matchlock and flintlock firearms.

Ammunition is one the most important components when referring to
firearms.  Though simple at first glance, the actual components of
ammunition are complex and deserve in depth view to understand the scientific
aspects and practical applications as used today to furnish those individuals
that need it as a form of life, such as law officers and military
personnel.  With the invention of the cartridge, the word ammunition has
begun expand its meaning, but essentially, it still means the same thing.
 



Make Sure You Know The Types of Ammunition

Make Sure You Know The Types of Ammunition

Just as there is many types of firearms, there are also many types of ammunition. Ammunition types can vary greatly depending on the scope and scale of firearm or application that is involved. Within the realm of firearms, there exists a vast number of different ammunition types, some designed specifically with use for a particular weapon. On a broader scale, ammunition types can vary on application or purpose, such as ordnance ammunition and naval ammunition, which have similarities with firearm ammunition, but definitely have their unique components and intended use.
Typically, the term firearms ammunition applies to the ammunition types used with conventional firearms, such as shotguns, rifles, and handguns. However, in military terms, firearms ammunition refers to the ammunition types used by an infantry soldier.
As can be assumed, even though the military employs some of the same or similar weapons available to regular citizens, a soldier is bound to have access and use weaponry that is not common to everyday people and is more powerful. Thus the term firearm ammunition itself can vary on the classification or description of types of ammunition, depending on whether it is used to describe warfare-related ammo or civilian-use ammo.
For the purpose of civilian use, ammunition types will vary depending on the type of firearm being used–i.e.: shotgun, rifle, or handgun. The ammunition type will used will also depend on its intended purpose, such as hunting, sport shooting, self-defense, education and instruction, or law enforcement.
It would serve logic that a person using a firearm for self-defense would employ a different ammunition type than that of a hunter or gun instructor. It is important to consider the uses of the firearm and ammunition when an individual decides to buy ammunition. The considerations do not end there; to further add more complexity into the mix, an individual must also consider the required size of the ammunition needed in order to properly function in the owner’s firearm.
The diameter of a cartridge is known as caliber–for shotguns, the term gauge is used–which measured in both measured in inches and their metric equivalence. Many ammunition manufacturers will also use a name in conjunction with that caliber, such as .38 Special or .357 Magnum. Determining the appropriate caliber for a firearm is probably the most important factor when an individual seeks to buy ammunition.
Buying the incorrect ammunition will not only make the firearm work improperly–sometimes the cartridge or bullet will simply not fit in the barrel or magazine–but it can also cause potentially harmful discharge of the weapon, causing injury or even death. However, most firearm will express the caliber used for the firearm in the model name, 9mm Beretta or 9mm Glock for example. Once the appropriate caliber is defined, a person can then begin to consider the ammunition type in terms of purpose.
In the case of handguns, there are several options available. However, the most common ammunition type used is the hollow point or soft point bullet. The reasoning behind this trend is that a hollow point is that handguns are usually kept for either self-defense purposes or recreational use. The hollow point is designed so that it expands upon impact, allowing for less penetration of the target.
The advantage of this in the case of self-defense is that if by any chance the firearm must be used in a home or close quarters while a suspect is attacking, there is little to no chance of bullet ricochet. If the attacker is hit with a hollow point bullet, he is more likely to be disabled with one or two shots rather than several from a bullet that is designed to travel through a target. Frangible ammunition is similar to the hollow point in that it is the same in design, except the point of the bullet is filled with metal beads covered by a polymer cap.
Upon impact on hard surfaces, these beads disperse preventing ricochet. Full Metal Jacket ammunition refers to bullets that covered or jacketed by a metal alloy for the purpose of traveling faster and penetrating through a target. FMJ ammunition is most commonly used by the military because they have a reputation of rarely jamming a firearm, making them more reliable in combat. They are available for civilian use as well, and simply a matter of preference in relation to purchasing them. 
Shotgun ammunition has its own various ammunition types. As mentioned before, shotgun ammunition is measured in gauges, and the appropriate one must be considered before one should buy ammunition.
There are three basic ammunition types for shotguns that are most commonly used today: Buckshot, Birdshot, and Slug loads. The choice of shotgun ammunition will also depend on the intended use or purpose of the firearm, as well as the intended target. Buckshot is ammunition that is loaded with lead balls of a fairly large diameter. This type of load is used in hunting big game animals and also self-defense. Birdshot is similar, but employs the use of smaller diameter lead balls.
As the name implies, it is commonly used in the hunting of birds. Slug shots consist of a solid lead shell that has the most destructive power out of the three and is commonly used mostly in law enforcement or in the military. In recent years, due to environmental controls and benefit, steel load versus lead load are being encouraged for use in firearms. Lead is the common preference because of its affordability, and because of its softer consistency, does not penetrate completely; steel tends to have more force and may prove dangerous due to ricochet, and over-penetration. 
Ammunition types vary greatly depending on the firearm. Furthermore, ammunition types not only vary in terms of conventional firearms, but also on larger scale weapons used by the military. It is important to do the necessary research in determining which ammunition type is best suited for the situation or use, while making sure that it is the appropriate caliber or gauge for the firearm which the ammunition will be used for.

What Are The Components of Ammunition

What Are The Components of Ammunition

Individuals inexperienced with firearms will mostly likely over look the complexity of what a bullet really is. The term “bullet” itself is the accepted vernacular regarding the projectile that is shot by a firearm. However, the “bullet” itself is only but a part of the actual projectile. Essentially, the way in which the term “bullet” is used day to day is a misnomer. This gives insight to the fact that ammunition is not as simple as the eye can see; there are components and parts that actually make the projectile function as it should.
The component of ammunition themselves will also vary depending of what kind of ammunition is being described. Because ammunition can refer to many types of projectiles, and not rifles, shotguns, or firearms, it is important to observe what kind of ammunition is described in order to detail how the components work for that particular type. For example the components for ammunition of a handgun will differ greatly from that of mortar, or even more so, from that a nuclear warhead. 
In describing the components of ammunition, it is best to start at the simplest and most basic type. It should be noted that throughout history, ammunition has developed and changed greatly. Cannonballs and ammunition for flintlock pistols can be considered the simplest kinds of ammunition; for modernity sake, it is deemed appropriate to start with the simplest kinds of ammunition and their components for modern firearms as are used today. The simplest kind of ammunition could be regarded as the “bullets” that are currently used in rifles and handguns today. 
A “bullet,” or more appropriately the cartridge, is probably the most basic type of ammunition in current day. A cartridge houses the bullet itself, as well gunpowder or cordite, and primer. The casing contains the propellant and primer of the cartridge. The casing of a cartridge is often made out of copper, but steel casings are also made because of its cost-effectiveness. If viewed from a vertical cross-section, the bullet is at top, followed by the propellant and primer.
The primer housed within the rim of the cartridge, located at the lowest part of the cartridge. The primer is the small cup at the bottom of the bullet that is struck by the firearm’s firing pin. A primer is typically constructed out copper or brass. The primer contains a small amount of an explosive mixture that ignites upon impact of the firing pin. The primer then acts as a catalyst to igniting the secondary or main charge, the propellant. 
The propellant of a cartridge is usually made out gun powder or cordite. Cordite is more typically used in modern day because it is a smokeless propellant was developed and produced in 1889 by the United Kingdom. Gun powder was initially used for all firearms until about the 19th century, when materials such as cellulose and glycerine were developed and researchers began to find a replacement for gun powder.
The bullet of the cartridge is the actual projectile that is fired and intended to strike or penetrate a target. Bullets can be made from may different materials and designs, all having a specific purpose. Lead is probably the most common and simplest type of bullet. A jacketed lead bullet is coated with a another material such as copper, steel, and other metal allows. Some jacketed bullets have the lead core entirely coated or encased and are referred to as full metal jacket bullets. Others leave the point of the bullet exposed, which upon impact expands and is more deadly.
These bullets are referred to as soft points or hollow point bullets. Steel bullets also are made and are often coated with nylon or Teflon to allow for long storage periods. Armor-piercing bullets are a type of jacketed bullet with a core material that is comprised of a high density metal, such as steel, tungsten, or even depleted uranium. A flat tip is often designed because it is more effective in penetrating the target. Tracer bullets have a flare material encased in a hollowed-out back.
These types of bullets are used often in the military as signals or markers for establishing targets and rendevous points for an air-lifted pick-up of troops. Incendiary bullets have an explosive compound at the tip that is to ignite upon impact with the target. These are often used with the purpose of igniting fuel or other flammable resources from a distance and to cause more damage of an area. There are also bullets designed to be used in situations such as instruction, practice, or in cases when non-lethal force is to be used. Practice bullets are often made out of materials such as plastic, wax, or even wood.
Because they travel at shorter velocities, they are intended to be used in short-range situations. Non-lethal bullets are often used in riot control by law enforcement or military personnel. They are usually made out of rubber or plastic; often bean bags are also used and fall under this category. Lastly, blank bullets are used to simulate actual gun fire. These often do not even contain an actual bullet element, are used only for the intention of producing live gun action and sound. 
A cartridge is only but a type of ammunition, and it is evident that it is complex in its nature. Furthermore, there also different types of cartridges, center fire and rim fire. Center fire ammunition is a cartridge that has a primer located at the center. Center fire are the ammunition types made in the United States. This type of ammunition has a firing pin strike the center fire primer to begin the first ignition process.
A rim fire cartridge differs from the center fire in that instead of the firing pin striking the center of the base of the cartridge, is strikes the rim, which contains the primer. These ammunition types are used generally by small caliber weapons, such as a .22 rifle. However, almost all semi-automatic firearms employ rimless ammunition. 
The components of ammunition all work together to make a cartridge–or “bullet”–actually function. There are many chemical processes that occur within that small object that make it operate that it can be argued is just as complex as a firearm. It is quite a marvel that such a small object has so many things occurring, and yet it is one of the most lethal and deadly objects to exist.

Ammunition Ease of Buying Ammunition at Sporting Goods Stores

Ammunition Ease of Buying Ammunition at Sporting Goods Stores

As federal and state laws mandate, there are certain regulations and restrictions regarding the sales and purchasing of ammunition. Ammunition sales are only to be made to those who are qualified under state and federal law. Federal law only requires that a person be at least the age of 18 to purchase ammunition for rifles and shotguns, and 21 for the purchase of ammunition for handguns. 
An eligible person must also be legally allowed to possess a firearm to purchase ammunition, which means no felony convictions, no history of violent crimes, no history of substance abuse, and a legal resident of the United States. Certain states reinforce these criteria by raising the age requirements, or adding stipulations regarding certain crimes. However, even with all these regulations in place, ammunition sales in sporting goods stores are on the rise. 
Many individuals resort to supplying themselves with ammunition at sporting goods stores because of convenience. No longer does an individual have to go to a specific firearm dealer or manufacturer to fulfill their ammunition needs. Furthermore, there seems to be less of a process to go through at sporting goods stores. One can simply pick up a box of ammunition, bring it to the counter, pay, and walk out. 
Though this aspect may seem as a great convenience to people legally allowed to own firearms and purchase ammunition, the relative ease has put many officials on alert on how easy it might prove to be for unqualified individuals to to buy ammunition. This subject has been recently addressed by the state of California that has recently enacted a bill that will require that ammunition sales be more regulated. The new law states that any person seeking to buy ammo must now provide for a fingerprint and leave his/her driver’s license information to be kept on file on the premises.
 This will allow the appropriate organizations to access the files and conduct background checks on the people buying ammo at these sporting goods stores. This aspect is to remedy the fact that no instant criminal background checks are conducted for the purchase of ammunition like it is required for the purchase of handguns. Many oppose this new law because it restricts lawful purchasers of ammo, and the businesses may be hurt by seeing a decline in ammunition sales. 
Furthermore, many believe that the new system for ammunition sales violates the costumer’s privacy. Even certain law enforcement oppose the bill because they believe that people barred from ammunition sales do not get their ammo from legitimate and certified places such as sporting goods stores. Evidence and studies have shown that convicted felons have, in fact, purchased ammunition with relative ease at these kinds of stores, but they still constitute a small percentage.
It is important to consider that because no background checks are needed to complete ammunition sales, only the verification of age–which is done with a driver’s license or state-issued I.D. card–the stores have no way in verifying a person’s qualifications, and by law, buyers only need to be of age. California has been one the first states to impose further regulations on ammunition sales, but surely other states will follow. 

Ammunition Illegal and Controversial Ammunition

Ammunition Illegal and Controversial Ammunition

Though the Second Amendment protects the citizen’s rights to bear arms, there are certain restrictions in place by federal, state, and local statutes that regulate the sell and possession of certain kinds of weapons. Though there is an on-going arbitration battle as to the legality and constitutionality of the imposed regulations, it does serve logic to protect the commonwealth from people possessing and purchasing military-grade firearms, regardless if they are qualified or experienced. 
The same ideal is applied to ammunition and certain types that may prove too dangerous to be used a public or societal realm. Though there is much controversy surrounding the issue, there are certain laws in place that regulate the sell or possession of certain types of ammunition, namely armor-piercing bullets. Hollow tip bullets, though not regulated, are also an issue of controversy because of its intended purpose of expanding or mushrooming upon impact.
Armor-piercing bullets are primarily developed with the use of small or conventional firearms with the purpose of penetrating body armor, such as a ballistics vest used by law enforcement officials. 
This type of ammunition is also capable of penetrating through car armor, concrete, and in some cases, tanks. Armor-piercing bullets consist of hardened steel at the tip, or extremely dense materials such as tungsten or depleted uranium. The penetrating component is often encased in a softer metal, such as copper or aluminum. This design is common for pistols or handguns. 
The rifle version of this ammunition is similar, but sometimes also employs the use of an explosive or incendiary tip to aid in penetrating the target. This may be the case when the ammunition used for anti-tank purposes. Typically, upon impact, the casing is destroyed, and only the hardened bullet penetrates the target. 
The argument regarding the legality of armor piercing bullets may seem to favor those who oppose them at first glance. Firstly, there is no reason why a civilian should have the use of armor piercing bullets. In conventional and legal use of firearms, this type of ammunition is not a necessity. In using a firearm for recreational, hunting, or sports shooting, armor piercing bullets are not only completely unnecessary, but also become a hazard. The very design of this type of bullet makes it dangerous because of how they are made to penetrate their targets completely. 
This proves to be dangerous in any situation where the shooting environment is surrounded by people, or the surroundings themselves are not completely known. An armor piercing bullet can easily penetrate a target and continue through it, hitting other objects in its trajectory. Because this type of ammunition is unpredictable in terms of its power and the plausible damage it might incur, many states in the country have made it illegal to possess or buy any kind of ammunition that is under this category. 
Currently there are eleven states that have barred the sale or possession of armor-piercing bullets: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Indiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. Though the severity of breaking any of these states armor-piercing bullets provisions all vary, they all impose a jail sentence, a fine, and sometimes both. These range from imprisonment for a minimum of one month to a maximum of ten years. The fines can range from $500 to a maximum of $15,000. Many of these states will implement a combination of both penalties, depending on the severity of the crime. 
Though there are no federal or imposed regulations regarding hollow points, there may be some local legislation in place restricting their possession or use. A hollow point or hollow tip bullet is a bullet that is designed to expand upon impact. The hollow tip is usually made of lead, because the softer material allows for the bullet to expand much easier. The main reason for this is to stop the bullet from penetrating too deeply. 
A secondary reason for the expansion, or mushrooming, upon impact is that is it causes much more damage to the muscle tissue or bones as it penetrates and travels through a target. The design of a hollow tip also lends for the bullet to be more accurate because the center of gravity is toward the rear of the bullet. 
The controversy surrounding this type of ammunition is one that can be tiredly debated. The fact is that there are both positive and negative factors regarding the use of hollow tips. The main purpose behind the hollow tip is to expand upon impact, which allows for greater stopping power; the projectile slows down as it enters the target because of the increased surface area due the expansion. This prevents the over-penetration of the bullet, thus reducing the risk of any collateral damage. 
Hunters and some law enforcement agencies favor this kind of bullet because there is virtually no risk of ricochet, and has extreme stopping power. Stopping power does not only refer to bullet’s ability to slow and come to halt better than other types, but also the stopping power it has due to the damage it causes a target. A hollow tip causes much more damage than a conventional bullet because of its expanding effect; due to its increase of surface area as it enters the target, more damage is done. 
This is another reason why hunters and law enforcement agencies favor this bullet. For hunters, it creates an opportunity to more humanely catch game because of the bullet’s ability to kill in one shot. For law enforcement officials, it provides them with a considerable force and the ability to stop perpetrators with one or two shots, which other bullets will take several more to disable the suspect.
However, stopping power in terms of damage and harm is one of the reasons that is also viewed as a negative. Military use of the hollow tips is prohibited under the Hague Convention of 1899. It states that during warfare, no bullet shall be used that easily expands or flattens in the body. Hollow tips undoubtedly cause more pain and are more fatal than bullets that pierce through a target. Countries that are part of NATO follow the Hague Convention and do not employ the use of hollow tips or hollow point bullets.

Understanding Ammunition Purchasing

Understanding Ammunition Purchasing

It might serve to think that gun ammo is not as difficult to acquire or purchase than a firearm itself. The are restrictions and regulations that limit the availability of shotguns, rifles, and handguns that vary on strictness depending on each state’s legislation. 
This is compounded by the fact that each state has specific rules that may not be compatible or as restrictive as other states, thus making the understanding of firearm laws that much more difficult. It is imperative for any person seeking to purchases or is currently an owner of a handgun to be fully aware of the laws imposed by the state; in some cases, being familiar with neighboring states’ laws is also suggested, if ever planning on traveling with a firearm to that state and participate in hunting and/or sporting activities. 
This is strongly advised to those firearm owners with licenses to carry concealed weapons, for not only do the restrictions differ from state to state, but some do not even allow for the concealed carry of firearms. Similar restrictions also apply for gun ammo and ammo sales. Certain states impose extra restrictions, as long as they do not violate or contradict the already imposed federal regulations.
For the most part, most states follow the basic outline for gun ammo and ammo sales that is provided by federal guidelines. The age requirement for the purchase of gun ammo is for an individual to be at least 18 years of age. 
This includes all gun ammo that is to be used for rifles and shotguns. Handgun ammo purchasing is reserved for those over the age of 21. As with firearms, the sale or purchase, or possession by convicted felons is strictly prohibited. This also includes individuals with a criminal history involving violent crimes–including domestic violence–as well as those with a history of substance abuse–including illegal drugs, alcohol, and/or controlled substances. 
Other restrictions include that no person that is an illegal alien; has been dishonorably discharged from the armed forces or military; renounced U.S. citizenship; fugitive from justice; or been committed to a mental institution may be in possession of gun ammo. Ammo sales to people that coincide with these criteria is also prohibited. 
Certain states take the restrictions of ammo sales a bit further by adding certain conditions or regulations to existing federal laws. Both the states of Illinois and Massachusetts require that individuals acquire a firearm identification card. 
The I.D. card is akin to a gun permit, and must be presented to the authorized dealer to purchase gun ammo. The I.D. cards must be applied for and the applicants are subject to pass a criminal history background check to be eligible. Other states limit the types of ammunition and the capacity of ammunition magazines that can be sold within their borders. 
Though strict regulations already apply at the federal level, eleven states impose stricter laws regarding armor-piercing bullets. This type of gun ammo is designed to pierce through ballistic vests, as well as vehicle armor, tanks, and concrete. It is obvious that with damage that this type of gun armor can incur, that would be regulated appropriately. 
Eleven states currently have stricter laws regarding armor-piercing bullets than originally found in federal legislation. Similar restrictions on large-capacity magazines are imposed by at least six states. A large-capacity magazine is individually defined by each state. A gun magazine is a container that houses cartridges that eliminate the need of individual reloading, and feeds the cartridges automatically as part of the weapon’s function. 
The states regulating these types of magazines each have their definition of as to how many cartridges in a magazine constitutes for the labeling of high-capacity. The capacity numbers range from as low as ten cartridges to no more than twenty cartridges. It is absolutely important for any firearm owner seeking buy gun ammo to be familiar with his/her state’s gun laws in order to avoid legal difficulties.
Aside from observing the legal boundaries of purchasing gun ammo, in recent times, the restrictions only seem to be getting tougher. It is predicted that President Obama’s term is bound to impose higher taxes in the sales of gun ammo. Since he became President, it seems as if gun ammo sales, as well as firearm sales, are on the rise. This leading to shortages of ammunition across all the country.
People are buying more than they usually would or need, simply because they want to stock up and avoid paying higher prices for their gun ammo. Though it is yet to be seen how the supposed ammunition taxes are going to affect sales, avid firearm users and supporters are trying to stock up just in case.

What Are The Ammunition Specific Laws

What Are The Ammunition Specific Laws

Because there is legislation regarding the use, possession, carrying, and ownership of firearms, it is deemed logical and necessary that gun ammunition also be regulated in a similar fashion. Much like firearm regulations, ammunition laws exist at both the federal and state levels, allowing states to further control gun ammunition by instituting more regulations and laws to restrict the ammunition as they deem appropriate. 
Federal ammunition laws serve as a template and guide that all states must adhere to. Provisions and additional restrictions may be imposed by each individual state, as far as they do not infringe on the federal laws. Federal law prohibits the possession and transfer of any kind of ammunition by convicted felons, and individuals with a history of substance abuse–including illegal drugs, alcohol, and controlled substances–and those with domestic violence restraining orders. 
Federal law also restricts the sale of gun ammunition to those under the age of 18. Handgun ammunition may not be sold to or bought by anyone under the age of 21. Other federal provisions include the restriction of gun ammunition to the following:
     Illegal aliens
     Individuals that have renounced U.S. citizenship
     Individuals legally considered to have a mental disability
     Individuals committed to a mental facility, either voluntarily or otherwise
     Individuals dishonorably discharged from the military and armed forces of the U.S.
Certain states impose certain restrictions and regulations that further control the transaction, possession, and carrying of gun ammunition. Certain states may employ some of the same restrictions as imposed by the state, but adjusting them in such a way that would make them more restrictive without violating federal law. Other states require a certain kind of permit in order to purchase ammunition. 
Certain states also regulate the type of ammunition that an individual may purchase or possess. The states of Illinois, Massachusetts, and Delaware all impose extra provisions on the requirements of federal law to legally be in possession of gun ammunition. Illinois implements that no person with misdemeanor convictions may possess ammunition. This provision does exclude traffic violations. 
Any person that is considered to be a juvenile delinquent is also barred. Massachusetts employs similar restrictions, but also adds that any person under age of 15 may not posses any gun ammunition. Those over the age of 15 may possess gun ammunition under written consent of a parent or legal guardian. Delaware restricts any person under the age of 25 that has been considered a juvenile delinquent in the past from possessing ammunition. 
Furthermore, Illinois and Massachusetts both require a permit in order purchase ammunition as well as firearms. These permits, called firearm identification card (FOID), must be presented at the time of purchase to legally acquire firearms or ammunition. The application for a FOID card must be made with the proper law enforcement authority or organization, and each applicant is subject to pass a criminal background check before being eligible to receive the permit. 
Massachusetts goes one step further by designating two classes of FOID cards. Class A FOID cards are available to those over the age of 21 legally permitted to purchase firearms and gun ammunition. Class B FOID cards are issued to applicants over the age of 18, and restricts the purchase of gun ammunition for smaller capacity firearms.
There are also many states that impose regulations on the type of ammunition that can be bought, sold, or possessed with the limits of their borders. The following all have restrictions on Armor-Piercing Ammunition, and provide for their own unique methods of employing those regulations: Alabama, California, Connecticut, Indiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas. Some states also have restrictions on large-capacity magazines.
A magazine is a storage and feeding device that eliminates the need to reload each individual cartridge before discharging. Each of these states defines a large-capacity magazine by its own standards, which range from a maximum of ten to a maximum of twenty: California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. For the exception of Hawaii, this restriction applies to all types of firearms; Hawaii restricts only handguns from having large-capacity magazines.