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Gun Laws

Gun Laws Made Easy

Gun Laws Made Easy

The most important legal foundation for gun laws in the United States comes from the source of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, as has been interpreted to allow wide latitude for gun ownership rights on the part of U.S. citizens and as such has been upheld in numerous Supreme Court decisions.
Gun law restrictions and allowances otherwise made throughout the country are made and enforced through both federal laws and state statutes, as may grant lesser ability to own and bear firearms than is provided by the traditional interpretation of the Second Amendment. 
In the broad context of the language contained in the Second Amendment, various federal laws have been passed which pertain to the ownership of guns, as include the 1934 National Firearms Act, the Gun Control Act of 1968, the Firearm Owner’s Protection Act of 1986, the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, the Federal Assault Weapons Ban of 1994, and the Gun Free School Zone Act of 1995.
The 1968 gun laws named individuals who would not eligible for the ownership of firearms within the United States, as would include people who had been incarcerated for various kinds of offenses, who were known to suffer from specific kinds of substance abuse problems or dependencies, who had mental health problems, who were in the country illegally, and other kinds of disqualifying characteristics.
State and federal laws within the United States typically provide for the ability of people to acquire handguns past the age of 21, and for the ability to acquire a rifle or shotgun past the age of 18.

Easy Guide to Gun Ban

Easy Guide to Gun Ban

In light of legislative attempts to limit the ability for own and use firearms and deadly weapons on the part of Americans, controversy in the American political scene has frequently arisen over the concept of a “gun ban,” according to which all or many guns would be confiscated from the ownership of private American citizens. 
During the 2008 Presidential presidential electoral campaign, worries were raised by conservative political activists over the threat, felt to be imminent, of President Obama’s gun ban. Discussion of the gun ban issue has referred to the previous legislation passed under the President Clinton administration comprised of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, also referred to as the Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Use Protection Act, with prohibited specified categories of semi-automatic guns from sale to private American citizens.
This gun ban was not passed into permanent effect, however, but instead with a built-in expiration provision, and as such ceased to carry legal effect in 2004. In this sense, no “Obama’s gun ban” law has been carried out or proposed under the Democratic Presidential administration voted in during the 2008 election. 
Discussion of the “Obama’s gun ban” concern has generally turned over proposals to carry out more extensive firearm registration than exists at present. In this regard, it has been noted by other commentators that the Supreme Court, as led by Chief Justice John Robert, is generally identified as inclining toward the political right, and as such has typically challenged gun ban attempts, such as those of the District of Columbia.

Quick Look Into Gun Violence

Quick Look Into Gun Violence

Gun violence statistics can be collected in the United States to indicate the rate both of murders in which gun violence is committed against other persons as well as accidents and suicides which also occur through the use and due to the ownership of a gun, typically in the home of the victim. In regard to the latter issue, it has been remarked upon that gun violence statistics indicate guns accounting for slightly more than half of the suicides which occur in the United States.
Gun violence statistics are commonly cited in political debates in the United States over the passage of legislation and regulation related to the restriction of gun ownership and use. The debate over gun violence has thus turned on the extent to which the imposition of legal measures on firearms can affect the rate of homicides being committed.
Notable single instances of gun violence, apart from the data shown through gun violence statistics, include the political assassinations of the 1960s as well as some of the high-profile shooting incidents which occurred in the 1990s and 2000s, including the Columbine High School shootings, the Virginia Tech shootings, and the Beltway sniper attacks.
In regard to the more recent shooting incidents in the United States which have been cited over the issue of the legal confiscation of firearms, data collected by the governmental agency of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicated that, in 2000, gun violence indicated in 52,447 deliberately caused injuries and 23,237 accidental injuries.

Arms Dealer Defined

Arms Dealer Defined

An arms dealer is an individual who sells firearms and other arms to individuals, organizations and nation states. An arms dealer can vary in mode of operation from a single business person to an employee of a large defense company.
An arms dealer may choose to sell off arms to military organizations, ranging from regular organizations such as the United States military to irregular groups such as guerrillas or to defense contractors. Selling arms can thus be provided for use in private settings, such as for self defense, or for the intentional use in a context such as a military campaign. 
An arms dealer at a level generally considered modest for the overall arms industry might often be one who provides arms to private citizens, alternately in the contexts of legally registered usage or use in criminal enterprises.
On the other hand, an arms dealer can also function as an important component of the overall global economy. In this regard, numbers have been issued which indicate that, overall, military economic transactions occur, on a yearly basis, with over $ 1 trillion dollars in terms of cash outlay, including arms sales.
Moreover, a 2006 report specifically on arms dealer activities found that the industry’s hundred largest companies made around $315 billion in sales. As with most aspects of the economy, the arms dealer industry has been found to be responsive to the reduction in available credit in the context of the general downturn in economic activities, with a 2008 1/2 fall in sales in the United States.

Gun Control Laws You Must Know

Gun Control Laws You Must Know

Current gun control laws in the United States are varied by state; federal level laws are most often very broad, widespread rules, as opposed to specific, nuanced, details rules on how guns are to be regulated. Nonetheless, understanding the most important federal gun control laws of today will be important for any who aim to become gun owners.
Title I of US federal gun control laws is the Gun Control Act of 1968. This gun control law prohibits certain categories of individuals from possessing firearms. Some of the categories include convicted felons, fugitives from justice, unlawful drug users, and those who have been dishonorably discharged from the military.
This gun control law also prohibits people younger than 18 years old from “possessing handguns or handgun ammunition with certain exceptions for employment, target practice, education,” and certain outlined defensive purposes.
The Gun Control Act is also the first gun control law that set up Federal Firearms Licenses, for individuals and companies who wish to sell firearms. No one and no company without a Federal Firearms License could sell guns, under this gun control law’s provisions.
Title II of America’s federal gun control laws is the National Firearms Act of 1934. The act, while old and somewhat overruled by newer gun control laws, still hold relevance on America’s general gun control policies.
This particular gun control law enforces the regulation of a number of types of firearms, including machine guns, short barreled rifles, short barreled shot guns, suppressors, and “destructive devices,” which includes grenades, bombs, and the like. In essence, the act ensures that these items will only be made by specifically licensed gun makers in America, and that their usage will generally, therefore, be curtailed.
The Gun Control Act of 1968 built onto the regulations set up by this earlier gun control law, by stating that the firearms regulated by the NFA were illegal to import, unless there could be a clear and reasonable case made for those firearms being used for sport. Thus, the two gun control laws together restrict these categories of weapons strongly, as they cannot be imported, and can only be made in America by specifically licensed companies.
The next most important gun control law is the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act. This act required that those who would purchase guns be run through a background check before they be allowed to actually obtain a gun.
This is one of the most hotly contested gun control laws in recent memory, as it originally greatly increased the waiting period required for obtaining a gun; when the gun control law came out, there was no quick and easy way to perform a background check. Four years later, however, the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, was developed, and is implemented for all background checks made to satisfy the requirements of this gun control law.
The NICS system allows for background checks to take place often over the space of a single phone call. Should a request for a background check be placed, and no denial comes within three days, then the individual may purchase a firearm, even if the background check technically did not complete.
There are other gun control laws of significance, including a current proposed reinstatement of the ban on assault weapons which expired in 2004, but the majority of these are likely to be state, not federal, laws, particular to your own home. The previously mentioned laws are the most important federal gun control laws for gun purchasers.