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Purchasing Guns

Gun Laws At A Glance

All You Need To Know About Purchasing Gun Parts

All You Need To Know About Purchasing Gun Parts

Purchasing gun parts and gun accessories are an interesting subtopic to the overall firearms industry. Gun laws posses multiple layers of regulation, both on federal and state levels.
Understanding the restrictions placed on purchasing and transferring gun parts and gun accessories is crucial for avid gun users, or sellers. In order to better clarify, we will separate ammunition from more specific gun accessories.
The transfer and possession of firearm ammunition is heavily regulated under Federal law. The most basic restriction is that convicted felons, habitual drug or alcohol users, illegal aliens, or individuals subject to domestic violence restraining orders are not permitted to purchase or transfer ammunition of any kind.
Federal law also restrict the sale of long gun ammunition to anyone under the age of 18, and handgun ammunition to anyone under 21. These are the broad regulations imposed by the Feds, but the market for ammunition is also regulated on state level. All gun accessories, such as ammunition vary greatly from state to state.  
Like gun laws themselves, states have wildly different regulations on the sale and possession of ammunition. For example, Illinois and Massachusetts both require a permit to purchase any form of firearm ammunition. Most states do not require permits to purchase guns, yet these two require a permit to purchase ammunition.
Currently there are 12 states that have a ban placed on armor-piercing ammunition. Alabama, California, Connecticut, Indiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas have all adopted restrictions on the transfer, possession or sale of armor-piercing ammunition. Violations vary based on state law from a $5,000 fine to up to 10 years in prison. 
The size of a magazine (a necessary gun part) also faces varying restrictions based on state law. California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York have all placed a limit on the size of a magazine round-the mean restriction is no more than 10-15 bullets per magazine. Other than the states already listed there are no regulations on caliber size, amount of ammunition, or magazine size. The other 35 or so states must only comply with the broad framework placed under Federal in terms of purchasing such gun accessories.
Gun Parts, such as silencers, assault rifle additions, scopes, and laser guides are all placed under the umbrella of Federal law. In order to buy an attachment for an assault rifle or any of the gun parts mentioned previously one must first require a federal license. Usually these licenses are only granted for law enforcement or military purposes. Unlike ammunition there is no variability in state laws with these gun parts. Other gun accessories, such as holsters, holders, targets, or even armor are available for immediate purchase and do not require licenses or regulations. 
The regulation on gun accessories and gun parts is easy to understand if the flow of laws is broken down into a simple formula. Separating laws of the Federal government, and understanding your particular states restrictions on gun accessories and gun parts will make the breakdown of laws easy to follow. 
  
  

Specific Laws You Should Know

Specific Laws You Should Know

Specific laws placed on purchasing firearms through gun shops and a gun store must be separated into two groups.  Due to their controversial nature, the distribution and selling of guns has both federal and state restrictions. 
Federal Regulations placed on gun shops and purchasing of firearms  


The following people are ineligible to purchase, possess, or transport firearms or ammunition:
    Those convicted of crimes punishable by imprisonment for over one year
    Fugitives from justice
    Those who have renounced their citizenship
    Individuals dishonorably discharged from the military
    Gun shops will not sell a rifle or shotgun to a person less than 18 years of age 
    A gun store will not sell a handgun to a person under the age of 21
    Persons convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence
    Those commuted to mental institutions or those who are mentally incompetent
    Gun shops will not sell to illegal aliens

Federal regulations which must be followed by gun dealers 
         An individual that does not possess a federal firearms license may not sell a gun to a resident of another state without first transferring the firearm to a dealer in the purchaser’s state
         Sale of a firearm at a gun store must be documented by federal form 4473
         The 4473 federal form must include information about the purchaser, the make and model of the firearm, and the serial number of the firearm
         If an individual purchases multiple handguns from a gun shop, additional forms must be sent to the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. 
Laws for purchasing at gun shops vary greatly based on state.  As stated before the federal umbrella, although the guiding force for legal matters, is often times ignored by state policy.  State gun laws vary greatly-each state possesses its own unique interpretation and set of laws in regards to possession, ownership, and concealment of guns.  Below is a set of basic purchasing requirements for each state.  The following list documents which states require a permit to purchase in a gun store. 

Gun Shops must review a permit to purchase in the following states:
         Connecticut
         Hawaii
         Illinois
         Iowa
         Massachusetts (Rifles included)
         Michigan
         Minnesota
         Missouri
         New Jersey (Rifles included)
         New York    (Rifles included in New York City)
         North Carolina
         Puerto Rico
All other states do not require a permit to purchase at gun shops.  The application process to obtain a permit in the above states varies greatly in terms of waiting times, safety requirements, amount of background checks required, and involvement of various bureaus or state departments.  The rules surrounding a gun store and gun shops vary greatly based on state and even jurisdiction.  Being cognizant of such differences is key to streamline the acquisition process of a firearm.  Understanding intricacies, and having a grasp for your particular state’s laws can save time, and more importantly legal troubles.

Understanding State Variations

Understanding State Variations

If you’re looking to purchase a gun in the near future you must be cognizant of the varying state laws placed on gun dealers and consumers. All 50 states have unique gun laws adopted through their particular legislation. In general, more conservative states will have looser gun laws while liberal states will possess more strict gun laws.
The starting point to purchase a handgun or rifle is a permit to purchase. States that require such a license will force a consumer to go through background checks, fingerprinting, and sometimes weapons training courses before purchasing a firearm through gun dealers. The following states require a permit to purchase a handgun at local gun stores-
     Connecticut
     Hawaii
     Illinois
     Iowa
     Massachusetts
     Michigan
     Minnesota
     Missouri
     New Jersey
     New York
     North Carolina
     Puerto Rico
States not listed do not require a permit to purchase a handgun through gun dealers. The length of validity and fees associated with a permit range between each state. The application process also varies, but most commonly includes-background checks, fingerprints, a fee of $100, and a life of 3 years before renewal. 
Although state laws vary greatly for gun dealers and buyers, gun stores must comply with the broad regulations in which Federal Law dictates. Before administering a transaction, a gun dealer must acknowledge that buyer of a handgun is over the age of 21, and legally competent to purchase such a weapon. An individual over the age of 18 is permitted to purchase a rifle or shotgun from a gun dealer.
Felons, drug addicts, the mentally deranged, and illegal aliens are all barred from purchasing a weapon at gun stores. Gun stores will accept any buyer if he/she is over 21 years of age and possess mandatory credentials imposed by state law. Although Federal law trumps state law, state gun dealers and law enforcement are not required to administer such laws.
More Conservative states, often ignore such practices as mandatory background checks at gun stores or gun shows to make transactions less complicated. A bill passed in 1994 (Brady Bill) required background checks at time of purchase at gun stores and gun shows. Currently only 8 states follow through with this “mandatory” check.
The most confusing issue in regards to state gun laws and their variations is the contradictions and backwardness associated with such differences. For instance, gun stores will recognize an out of state license from one state, but reject the same type of a license from another state. For example, Arizona will recognize a permit to carry from Nevada, but Nevada won’t recognize a permit to carry from Arizona. If an Arizona resident crosses into Nevada with a loaded handgun on him, shows an officer an Arizona license, he or she will be apprehended for illegal carrying. This generally has to do with concealment and carrying purposes, but if transactions were made through gun dealers one still must be aware of these nonsensical rules.   
It’s never good to generalize but in the case of varying gun laws stereotyping can make the process easier to understand. Conservative places, such as states in the deep south and Midwest will commonly have very loose gun laws, and often exclude permits for purchase as necessary. Liberal states, regions in the northeast, or west coast, will have more rigid gun laws, and although may not require permits or licenses for gun dealers, will still have complications in regards to purchase and use. 

What You Should Know About Purchasing Guns

What You Should Know About Purchasing Guns

Purchasing Guns Background
The act of purchasing firearms has long been a controversial issue in America. With two sides present (those who want more gun rights, and those who want more restrictions) America has taken a stance to regulate the purchases of handguns and machine guns on a federal level, while widely adopting a casual stance towards the purchase of hunting firearms.
Retail gun dealers are regulated under federal law, and cannot sell a firearm to any prospective buyer who can potentially pose a threat to society. Machine guns have widely been banned through the National Firearms Act of 1934 and require a special permit authorized only by the US Treasury Department.
Complexities arise in handgun laws because they are narrowly regulated on a local level. Each state has its own unique interpretation of handgun laws, which are enforced at all gun shops. The Brady Bill which was passed in 1994, is a Federal law that requires a background check and waiting period for all purchases of handguns. Laws pertaining to the purchase of firearms has been difficult to enforce due to an assortment of loopholes present in private transactions and the secondary markets.

Specific Laws
Specific laws regarding the purchase of firearms must be split into two groups-Federal laws and State laws. Federal regulations revolve around a prospective buyers disposition and whether or not he “poses a threat to society.” Common impediments for the purchase of a firearm are-convicted felon, fugitive, mental illness, or addiction to a stimulant.
In addition, Federal law states that no individual can purchase a handgun under the age of 21 or a rifle under the age of 18. Federal regulation is also present for distributors and sellers of firearms. All gun dealers must possess a FFL (federal firearms license) in order to sell firearms to individuals from outside states. The complexity and descriptive nature of gun laws is found at the local level. Each state possesses its own unique constitution which enforces its particular gun laws.
Because America has a lenient stance on gun laws when compared to other developed nations, the median interpretation for a states gun laws is as follows-no permit is required to purchase, a license of ownership is not necessary, nor is registration, however a permit is required to conceal a loaded handgun. A casual stance indeed, however, there are many states that do have a strict attitude towards guns and indeed require permits for purchase and a license for ownership. Examples of states with stringent gun control-New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, and California.    


State Variations
Each state has its own unique interpretation and enforcement method in regards to gun laws. Based on the Brady Scorecard (a scoring system to judge the strength of a state’s gun laws) more stringent gun control laws will be found in the Northeast, and West Coast, while regions such as the deep South, Midwest, and great plains will have possess a more casual stance.
Generally speaking, an individual will experience less red tape and fewer restrictions when purchasing a firearm in a conservative state as oppose to a liberal one. This statement can be somewhat justified when looking at which states require permits for purchase.
Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, and North Carolina. Complexities arise in state laws because of constant variation and a series of contradictory practices present in particular state’s constitutions. For instance, law enforcement in Arizona will recognize a permit to carry from Nevada, but Nevada won’t recognize a permit to carry from Arizona. Understanding your particular state’s gun laws is necessary to avoid a serious conflict. 

Purchasing Gun Parts
Like the laws regulating the purchasing of firearms, the obtainment of gun parts must follow a federal and local legal code. The accessory most rigidly governed by federal law is ammunition. The most basic restriction is that convicted felons, habitual drug or alcohol users, illegal aliens, or individuals subject to domestic violence are not permitted to purchase or transfer ammunition of any kind.
Federal law also restrict the sale of long gun ammunition to anyone under the age of 18, and handgun ammunition to anyone under the age of 21. Accessories and gun parts are also regulated under local law, and subject to variation based on state. Only two states (Illinois and Massachusetts) require a permit to purchase ammunition, however, many states do impose a restriction on armor piercing ammunition, purchases made in bulk, and magazine size.
Gun Parts, such as silencers, assault rifle additions, scopes, and laser guides are all placed under the umbrella of Federal law, and require specific licensing. Although similar to the structure of gun laws, gun parts and accessories are more closely governed by the federal government. 

Online Purchasing

Like most purchases made online, a gun transaction over the internet awards a buyer with numerous intangible benefits. A consumer is given more options in terms of selection, and purchasing techniques.
The price of guns purchased online is significantly lower as a consumer will be given the opportunity to compete in auctions or to purchase used guns. Although a frightening prospect, gun purchases made online are regulated by federal law and are considered secure and legitimate. In order for a firearm to be purchased over the internet the following process must be met-all guns purchased online must be shipped only to a holder of a Federal Firearms License.
The firearm is not shipped to the consumers house, but instead, to the closest licensed gun dealer in the buyer’s area. Once the gun is shipped, the consumer must present and fulfill his local state’s requirements in regards to permits or licenses for the purchase to be finalized.

Purchasing Guns Background Overview

Purchasing Guns Background Overview

Purchasing firearms in the United States, especially handguns, has long been a complex and passionate issue. Guns for sale, is a controversial issue because of the products unique dichotomy.
Gun rights activists view it as a mechanism that enables self-protection, and upholds our country’s rich hunting tradition; while gun control enthusiasts believe it is merely a tool used for violence. With these drastic sentiments present, America’s government has attempted to regulate handgun purchases, while applying little restriction on hunting firearms such as rifles or shotguns. 
 
The broad laws placed on gun shops in America are enforced through the Federal government’s regulations. Guns for sale will not be awarded to any individual who falls under the various characteristics for ineligibility. 
Must have a clean criminal record
Cannot be a fugitive
Gun shops will not sell to users of certain depressant, narcotic, or stimulant drugs
Guns for sale will not be allowed to illegal aliens, those who have renounced American citizenship, or those dishonorably charged from the military
Guns for sale will be denied to any person with an active restraining order, convicted of domestic violence, or those who have criminal backgrounds in regards to transporting firearms
A dealer of a gun shop must also comply with federal law by meeting regulations. Guns for sale will be legal if the gun shop complies with these regulations-
An individual 21 years or older may acquire a handgun from a dealer who is federally licensed to sell firearms in the state in question.
An individual 18 years or older may may purchase a rifle or shotgun from a federally licensed dealer/gun shop in any state. Hunting guns for sale come with less restrictions
Purchase at a gun shop must be documented by a federal form 4473, which identifies and includes other information about the purchaser, and records the make, model, and serial number of the firearm. Guns for sale that are not documented by such forms will be considered illegal and the dealer will be subject to a year of imprisonment. 
Guns for sale outside of gun shops are much more difficult to regulate and are abused through various loopholes. Private transactions between a seller and a dealer often times do not meet any of the federal laws including back ground checks. Gun shows are the most common arena for illegal gun purchases to take place.
Although the Brady Law instituted a mandatory background check on all firearms purchased at both guns shows and gun shops, loopholes exist in the form of “private transactions.” If an individual goes to a gun shop with his personal collection any sale will be regarded as a private transaction and will be deemed free from regulation. 
The regulations of firearms in the United States becomes highly complex when viewing state’s interpretations of gun control laws. Each state adopts its own constitution in regards to permits for purchase/carry, license for ownership, requirements, and regulations on guns for sale. Some states have scrupulous stances on gun control while others are very lenient.
The median sentiment will not require a permit for purchase, a license of ownership, nor regulation, but will demand a permit to carry or conceal a handgun. Other states with diverse urban environments, or high crime rates will tend to place more restrictions on gun shops.