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Understanding Sawed Off Shotgun

Understanding Sawed Off Shotgun

The various shotgun parts each provide for certain functions of a shotgun. For instance, the trigger is just one of the shotgun parts that propels the ammunition through the barrel of the gun. The length of the barrel directly effects the firing power of the weapon and the speed at which the ammunition is propelled out of the weapon.
Sawed off shotguns can be especially deadly because the ammunition is propelled faster than it would be if the barrel was complete. In addition, sawed off shotguns are easy to conceal, which makes them extremely dangerous for law enforcement in certain situations, such pulling  over a vehicle that may contain a sawed off shotgun.
In the United States, it is illegal to posses a sawed off shotgun that has a barrel length of less than eighteen inches, unless the individual has obtained a taxed permit from the ATF. That permit requires a background check and payment of an excise tax for that weapon. However, each state has different laws which govern the types of weapons that residents are allowed to own and a state may forbid ownership of a sawed off shotgun, simply because of the ease with which it can be concealed.
Sawed off shotguns can be easily hidden and they are very powerful. However, they may not be as accurate as shotguns that have the longer barrel. That inaccuracy is another danger present by use of this type of weapon.

Quick Outline of Shotguns

Quick Outline of Shotguns

Shotguns can use slugs or small pellets as ammunition. Shotguns can be manually loaded, semi-automatic or automatic. The guns are fired while resting on the shoulder of the shooter.
Shot guns are often used for recreational purposes, such as hunting and clay shooting.

Shotgun license
Shotguns are dangerous weapons which can inflict injury and death  when the proper safety precautions are not taken. Shotgun accidents which often occur during hunting season,are usually the result of inattention or a lack of safety precautions. Shotgun licenses, when used in concurrence with safety classes, often reduce the frequency of shotgun accidents.

Automatic shotgun
Automatic shotguns require that the shooter pull the trigger and hold it down, for as long as they wish the weapon to continue firing. Semiautomatic shotguns require the shooter to continue to pull the trigger. Both types of weapons are self loading and will continue to fire as long as there is ammunition.


Sawed off shotgun
Sawed off shotguns are those which have a barrel length of less than eighteen inches. The weapons are  powerful and propel ammunition faster than those that have a longer barrel. However, the weapons can be fairly inaccurate. It is illegal to posses sawed off shotguns in the United States, unless the owner has obtained a special permit. However, some states may completely disallow ownership of sawed off shotguns.


Shotgun sales
Shotgun sales fall under the jurisdiction of the federal government, as well as the jurisdiction where the sale is taking place. Although the federal government may allow citizens to posses shotguns, some states may forbid the ownership of certain types of weapons. 

Shotgun At A Glance

Shotgun At A Glance

Shotguns can use several types of ammunition, including shot or slugs. Shot is small pellets and slugs are singular larger pieces  of ammunition. Shotguns are held on the shoulder when fired and can be of various sizes.
There are also various types  of shotguns, including single-barreled and double barreled. Shotguns can be  hand loaded, semi automatic or automatic. Some types of shotguns are generally utilized for recreation, such as hunting  or clay shooting. Shotguns may also be used for other purposes, including use by the military.
These guns were considered valuable to the military, as they were very beneficial in close range fighting. The guns were fairly accurate and easy to handle when the enemy was close. More recently however, these guns have been replaced by more modern versions of the rifle, as they tend to be more accurate and easier to handle.
In fact, the gun which was the original form  of the modern shotgun, the musket, was frequently used by the military in the eighteenth century. Guns which could be considered a combination shotgun and musket are currently used for riot control in some locations. In fact, many jurisdictions of law enforcement, have one of these guns on hand.
Shotguns can be used for a variety of purposes, as they come in many styles. Those guns which shoot small pellets would likely be used for different purposes that those that utilize slugs. However, either types of ammunition can cause injury and death.

What You Need To Know About Shotgun License

What You Need To Know About Shotgun License

Shotguns are dangerous weapons,regardless of the type of ammunition used. Pellets and slugs can cause injury when fired from a shotgun and shotgun accidents often occur during hunting season. In some cases, shotgun accidents occur when the gun is fired accidentally and in other cases, other individuals are accidental shot when an individual fires the shotgun while hunting.
Although shotgun licenses are required for hunting in most states, some states don’t require safety training. Safety training which works  in concurrence with a shotgun license, greatly reduces the risks associated with shotgun accidents.
Shotgun news also includes cases in which individuals are caught with sawed off shotguns. These weapons can be especially deadly and the legal penalty for possession a sawed off shotgun is harsh. Shotgun news includes bank robberies and other crimes which have been committed with these types of weapons. For that reason, shotguns are registered and require a license in most jurisdictions. This makes it easier to track ownership of each weapon, especially when they are used during the commission of a crime.
Like any weapon, shotguns are dangerous when they are in the wrong hands, including individuals that have not taken safety precautions. Shotguns accidents are fairly common during hunting season in some jurisdictions. When using any weapon, individuals should receive training and pay careful attention to what they are firing at, while being certain that no individual is near the game they are hunting.

Your Guide to Types of shotguns

Your Guide to Types of shotguns

Unbeknown to many, the classic shotgun has taken on a variety of forms over the past few decades. Commonly thought of as a burly hunting weapon requiring a manual reload and cock back after each discharge, newer models of the shotgun have revolutionized loading times and rates of fire.
For clarity’s sake we will divide shotguns into 4 basic groups:single shot, double barrel, pump action, and automatic/semi-automatic. The differing classifications arise due to different mechanisms in the weapons which alter the guns firing rates, and method.
A single shot shotgun only holds one shell at a time, and is considered to be the most traditional form of shotgun. The single barrel shotgun is light, relatively inexpensive, and uses either break action or pump action to fire.
Only capable of firing one cartridge at a time, the single barrel shotgun requires a manual reload for another discharge to take place. These types of shotguns are generally used for hunting, competitive target shooting, and teaching purposes. A classic for of a single barrel shotgun is the Winchester Model 1897-
Characteristics for the Winchester Model 1897- 
       Produced from 1897 to 1957 the Winchester Model 1897 was offered in 12 and 16 gauges
       The 12 gauge model has a 30-inch barrel while the 16 gauge has a 28-inch barrel
       Was a pump-action single barrel shotgun and had an effective range of 22 meters
       Weighed 8 lbs and was 39 inches in length
Shortly after the inception of the single barrel shotgun, the “Queen of shotguns” was invented in the form of the double barrel shotgun. Traditional and aesthetically pleasing, the double barrel shotgun fires two cartridges consecutively and uses a break action for reloading purposes.
The barrels are parallel to each other on the gun and built on a slight angle so the cartridges will actually converge once they reach about 40 yards. After the shots are discharged the user must flip the fun open (almost as if he were breaking it) to reveal the chamber and reload new cartridges. Newer models have automatic ejectors, which propel the empty cartridges when the gun is “broken.”
Older models came with two triggers to fire the weapon, however, more recent models have one trigger which can allow the operator to fire the cartridges simultaneously although this is not recommended. The double barrel shotgun fires one cartridge at a time, but can be fired rapidly through a clockwork system found inside of the gun.
Semi automatic or automatic shotguns are the latest innovation, and are typically used in the military or law enforcement. Using gas, inertia, or a recoil operations, the automatic shotgun can fire consecutive cartridges with a simple depression of the trigger.
Instead of manually reloading through breaking or pumping, the automatic family of shotguns will cycle each time the weapon is shot, automatically eject the spent shell, and subsequently reload the firearm with a fresh cartridge. Most semi-automatic shotguns have selective fire which can alternate between semi-automatic fire and traditional pump action firing. Although grouped in the same category, there is an inherent difference between semi-automatic and automatic shotguns.
Automatic shotguns are unique and uncommon, they can fire multiple cartridges rapidly with one simple trigger squeeze; semi automatic shotguns fire one shot per trigger squeeze and require a following trigger depression to subsequently discharge. Due to their rapid firing capabilities the use and sale of these weapons are highly regulated by the United States government.  
Shotguns are a unique family of firearms because of their varying uses. Traditionally, single pump or double barreled shotguns are used for recreational purposes like hunting or clay shooting; while the more advanced semi-automatic and automatic models are strictly used by the military and law enforcement agencies.

Understand The Shotgun Concerns Before Buying

Understand The Shotgun Concerns Before Buying

A shotgun is a powerful form of firearm typically fired from the shoulder. Although there are varying sizes, the average shotguns is a large burly weapon, which uses energy from a fixed shell to dispense a number of small spherical pellets. Unlike common forms of ammunition, the shotgun fires a cartridge which then disperses into smaller fragments. Although the range from the blast is limited, the widening angles available from the dispersed pellets are unmatched.
 
 
Weapons such as shotguns and rifles are thought to be used primarily for hunting and recreation. That being said, the laws regarding such weapons are fairly lax and casual throughout the United States. A prospective buyer will encounter limited red tape or procedural barriers when attempting to purchase, use, or carry a shotgun.
 
 
The average state does not require a permit for purchase, a license for ownership, a registration, nor even a permit for concealed carry. The ideology behind this casual stance stems from the weapons intended use. As a result of their size and cumbersome nature the practicality behind wielding a shotgun in public is unrealistic. Unlike pistols which are concealable and easy to tot around, the shotgun is a large firearm (on average 28-32 inches long) incapable of concealment or inconspicuous use.
 
 
Statistics regarding shotgun related deaths have not been recorded on a national scale. Considering handguns make up 50% of homicides via firearms one would imagine that shotguns have played a role in roughly 20% of all murders.
 
 
The primary difference between shotgun related murders and handgun murders is their intent and nature. The majority of deaths imposed by shotguns are hunting accidents, suicides, and mass shootings. An overwhelming percentage of firearm homicides occur in America's urban environments.
 
 
The majority of shotguns are found in rural areas or states with fertile hunting grounds. When you couple these facts together, the nature of shotguns becomes transparent. As a result of their size, limited range, bulkiness, and inherent nature the shotgun is simply impractical in regards to precipitating separate acts of violence.
 
 
The average firing rate of a shotgun is extremely slow. An operator must first, withstand the blowback from the powerful discharge, then manually reload two more cartridges (given the style of shotgun.) Unlike revolvers, semi-automatic weapons, or fully-automatic guns a shotgun operator wastes precious seconds when reloading his/her weapon. This inherent feature of the weapon directly impedes the gun's firing rate.
 
 
Although the cartridges are more powerful, they cannot be fired without manual intervention. The major concern associated with shotguns is their accessibility. As a result of their deregulation, an individual who is unstable is more than capable of obtaining such a weapon. Given the prospective user, the weapons convenience combined with its innate power could result in  catastrophic implications.
 
 
Shotguns have played a major role in many of the infamous shooting sprees in American history. Instances such as the Columbine massacre are a reminder of the dangers and accessibility that these weapons possess. That being said, the true concerns associated with the shotgun are simply based on the individual's intentions.
 
 
The weapon is deregulated because it has plays an intricate part in many hunting, recreational, and competitive activities. For the majority of Americans, shotguns symbolize a rite of passage, a symbol of our nation's history, but for others, the convenience and potent nature represent an opportunity to inflict harm on a community.

Easy Guide to Shotgun Laws

Easy Guide to Shotgun Laws

Ironically, shotguns are more casually regulated in the United States when compared to smaller or weaker firearm counterparts.
Although more powerful than most consumer guns, the laxity in regulation is present because shotguns play a vital role in various recreational activities, such as hunting or target shooting. Generally long guns such as shotguns or rifles are primarily used for such sports, and thus meet far less restriction in regards to permits, licenses, or registration requirements.
Unlike handguns,which are responsible for roughly 70% of annual firearm homicides, shotguns have a surprisingly small effect on our country’s violent crime statistics. The loose laws pertaining to shotguns, thus stem from both necessity, and tradition. Similar to other classifications of firearms, shotguns are regulated by varying state and Federal governments.
Regulations on a federal level for shotguns pertain to length, barrel size, firing rates, and caliber. The length of a shotgun barrel for instance must be at least 18.5 inches or else the firearm is classified as a short barreled shotgun, and deemed illegal under the National Firearms act of 1934. Shotguns with semi-automatic or fully automatic capabilities are also regulated under the National Firearms act of 1934 and require special permits for purchase by an ordinary citizen.
Shotguns used by police enforcement or the military are also federally regulated and require special taxes, background checks, training tests, and a justifiable reason to own such a weapon. The federal government acts as a broad umbrella for gun laws; it simply regulates those firearms which have no justification for use in society.
The goal of the Federal government is to control weapons that pose violent threats to everyday citizens. The age limitations for a shotgun is an example of this belief-an individual must be at least 18 years of age to buy a shotgun, and 21 years of age to purchase a handgun. Even though the handgun is much weaker in regards to firing power and size, it is regulated more scrupulously because of the violent impact its had on society.
The complexity of gun laws is found at a state level, in the form of varying regulation and differing processes. To better illustrate America’s lenient stance on guns all one has to do is look at the average state regulation for shotguns or rifles.
The mean requirements essentially minimal-no permit is required at purchase, ownership of the shotgun is not necessary, nor is licensing, and a permit is not even needed to carry or conceal. The most common regulation found in state’s gun law fall under “state preemption of local restrictions,” which simply disallows an individual to use a shotgun in a restricted area or ground.
Gun control laws vary widely based on state but for the most part-areas with expansive hunting grounds (states in the Midwest and deep South) will adopt a lenient stance towards the purchase and use of such firearms. There are a handful of states and jurisdictions that do require a permit to purchase a shotgun such as:New Jersey, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, New York City, and Illinois are examples.
Variation is also found in concealment laws. The previous states and jurisdictions all require permits to conceal as well as a few others including-Utah, Colorado, Connecticut, and Iowa. If you are an avid hunter or sportsmen, having knowledge of your state’s shotgun laws is critical to avoid stress, fines, or further punishment.
    

Shotgun Overview

Shotgun Overview

Types of Shotguns
 
 
Although generally regarded as a burly weapon incapable of rapid fire, the shotgun has encountered numerous alterations as a result of advancements in technology.
 
 
There are four universally accepted categories of shotgun:single shot, double barrel, pump action, and automatic/semi-automatic. The single shot version is the first form of shotgun; generally regarded as a beginners model, the single shot shotgun holds one shell at a time and uses either break action or pump action to fire.
 
 
The single shot model is generally used for hunting, teaching purposes, and competitive target shooting. The first advancement made in the shotgun field was the development of the double barrel model. The double barrel shotgun possesses two parallel barrels, which enables the operator to fire two consecutive rounds. After the shots are discharged the user will "break" the weapon and subsequently reload fresh cartridges.
 
 
Newer versions of the firearm are equipped with ejectors, which automatically spew the spent cartridges when the gun is broken. Semi-automatic and fully-automatic models are the latest and most uncommon forms of the shotgun. Mostly used by the military or law enforcement these forms of shotguns use gas, inertia, or recoil mechanisms to automatically reload cartridges.
 
 
Operators of the semi-automatic shotgun will be allowed to fire cartridges with each trigger depression without manual intervention. The fully-automatic version allows consecutive discharges so long as the trigger maintains a depressed state. Due to their rapid firing rates and inherent power, these inventive forms of the shotgun are highly regulated by the federal government.
 
 
Shotgun Laws:
 
 
Although more powerful than other firearms, the shotgun is regulated more casually than their counterparts. As a result of their implied use, the mean gun law interpretation across states in regards to shotguns is minimal. No permit is required for purchase, use, or even concealment. In addition, a license of ownership or registration of the weapon is not mandatory.
 
 
The laxity in laws stems from the firearm's intended use. Hunting, skeet shooting, and other forms of recreational target practice are wildly popular in the United States. Long guns also know as rifles and shotguns are the weapons used in these particular sports. Combine the implied use of the weapon with its physical characteristics and the lenient stance becomes understandable. Shotguns are burly, cumbersome, and incapable of concealment. The weapons are impractical to carry around as a means to inflict harm or create crime.
 
 
Laws are placed on guns as a result of their practicality and hypothetical dangers imposed on society. Federal laws provide a broad framework for the use and possession of such weapons. Age limits and an individual's disposition are governed by the federal government, but varying state interpretations are the chief regulators in terms of use, possession, ownership, and concealment.
 
 
As oppose to handgun laws, which greatly differentiate based on state, the level of vacillation in regards to shotgun laws is somewhat uniform. Due to their obscene power, the semi-automatic and fully-automatic models, are however, regulated scrupulously by federal law.
 
 
Shotgun Concerns:
 
 
Shotguns are more powerful than their counterparts, however, the threat of the weapon is minimal due to its implied use and cultural significance. The majority of firearm related homicides or injuries are implemented through the use of handguns.
 
 
An overwhelming percentage of firearm related homicides take place in America's urban environments. Due to the shotguns size and inability to conceal, these weapons are typically not found in areas with high population densities. That being said, the shotgun is uncommon in regards to wide spread isolated incidences of violence. The largest concerns attached to the shotgun stem from the accessibility of the weapon and accident-related deaths. 
 
 
Across the nation, shotguns are regulated more casually than their counterparts. A prospective shotgun buyer is free from the procedural red tape accustom in the process of purchasing a handgun. As a result of this laxity, the shotgun, a weapon that possess incredible power, can easily wind up in the hands of an unstable individual. The concerns over shotguns do not revolve around repeated violent actions, but instead, the combination of availability, coupled in with an individuals disposition and intention.
 
 
A large percentage of shotgun related deaths stem from hunting accidents and suicides. The weapon is extremely powerful, a wound with a shotgun typically inflicts serious injury or death. With a high kill rate, easy accessibility, and varying use the shotgun, solely by nature, can pose substantial problems.