Minnesota Hunting Laws

Minnesota Hunting Laws

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Minnesota Hunting Laws
In order to hunt in Minnesota, there are a variety of licenses that you can choose from depending on who you are and what you plan to hunt. Curiously enough, despite the range of ages specified in the varying licenses seeming to go from 10 to infinity, there exists a lifetime license for a child as young as 3 years of age. Payments are accumulated per category, however. These include fishing at $227, small game at $217, Sports at $357, and Deer with firearms or archery at $337. These are, of course, for youth taking Minnesota as their legal residence. 
As always, prices for nonresidents are increased by good amounts. Individuals may not buy, sell, transport, or possess protected wild animals without a license unless otherwise specified. On border waters of adjacent states, etc., a Minnesota hunting license will only allow you to take wild animals on the Minnesota side of the border.
Purchasing a license does not guarantee possession for the life of the license, however. An individual convicted of 2 or more violations under a small game or trapping license within a 3-year period may have their small game hunting or trapping privileges revoked for one whole year. This can increase to 3 years or more depending on the violations and the frequency at which they occur. 
There are also strict regulations when it comes to use of firearms. Minnesota gun rights include no permit, registration or licensing required to purchase, own, or carry shotguns or rifles. Permits are required only to purchase and carry handguns. In terms of hunting regulations, a person may not transport a firearm on a motor vehicle unless it is unloaded, cased, or unloaded in a closed trunk. An archery bow or crossbow may not be transported, likewise, unless the bow is not armed with a bolt or arrow.
Individuals 18 and older may carry a handgun in the woods and fields or on waters to hunt or shoot targets. Those under 18 may also do so if under the supervision of a parent or guardian, and if they meet specific fire safety requirements. No person is allowed to possess a firearm or ammunition outdoors during the time beginning the fifth day before the open firearms season and ending the second day after the close of the season within an area where deer may be legally taken by firearms.
Though there are lists specifying the protection of certain animals, there also exists animals whom Minnesota does not protect. These include weasels, coyotes, gophers, porcupines, striped skunks, and all other mammals for which there are no closed seasons or other protection. They may be taken in any way except for use of artificial lights, a motor vehicle, or poisons not in accordance with label regulations of the state Department of Agriculture and federal Environmental Protection Agency. Awareness of the multitude of rules and regulations set forth by the state on Minnesota is vital to a successful hunting season.

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