State Hunting Laws

West Virginia Hunting Laws

West Virginia Hunting Laws

West Virginia hunting has made some minor changes this season. They have
recently extended “antler less” deer hunting, which now begins in September for
both archery, and muzzleloader hunting. This decision was made due to two
reasons, first being the roughest times of winter affecting these hunters’
season, and for the rapid increase in deer population within the region.

Like every other state, there are different licenses for
different game. The main licenses held by hunters in the state of West Virginia
are classes A, X, and XJ. A being Buck only gun season, X being Bow, buck only,
and muzzleloader, while XJ is Junior bow, buck-only, and muzzleloader. There
are certain additions needed when hunting for bears, coyotes, antler less deer,
or other West Virginia hunting game.

Any person born on, or prior to January 1, 1975 must present
a certificate of satisfactory completion of a Hunter Education Course in order
to be issued a hunting license or a stamp. A person is not eligible to hunt
unless they have the proper licenses, a photo ID, and a proof of hunter safety
certification if required.

West Virginia has a point system set up for hunting
violations in order to prevent reckless or negligent acts. Persons found guilty
of either shooting a human or livestock automatically have their license
revoked for five years. The highest amount of points one could accumulate is
ten points, before their license is suspended for a total of two years. Points
are removed after the second year of revocation or upon renewal of license.

Like any other state, West Virginia land regulations are
designed in order to prevent recklessness, protect the interest and safety of
others, along with preventing intent of unethical conducts. It is illegal to
hunt in state parks, safety zones in state forests, and or wildlife management
areas. Without the permission of the landowner, it is prohibited to shoot,
hunt, or trap upon the fenced or posted grounds of another person. It is
illegal to hunt with a fully automatic firearm, or carry and uncased or loaded
gun after 5 am on Sunday in counties which prohibit Sunday hunting, except at a
regularly used firearm range, or except as provided in the trapping
regulations.

For any further questions regarding West Virginia hunting or
hunting on specific West Virginia land, there are many contacts who are readily
available to assist you. You can either go on www.wvhunt.com or contact (304)
558-2758.

Wisconsin Hunting Laws

Wisconsin Hunting Laws

Wisconsin
hunting offers a variety of game, from white-tailed deer to black bears. Not
only does Wisconsin offer a menagerie of hunting species, but also beautiful
landscapes to hunt them on.

Initially when going to acquire your Wisconsin hunting license, you want to
know what you are looking to hunt. Different game requires different license so
you want to make sure you have the right licensing and steer clear with the
law.

There is a new law which formulated a hunting mentorship program for novice
hunters that will take effect September 1, 2009. Under the new law, a novice
hunter must be at least 10 years of age, possess the appropriate hunting license,
permits and tags, and must hunt with a mentor who is 18 years of age or older.
The novice hunter need not first complete hunter education to obtain a hunting
license or hunt, but may only hunt within arms reach of a mentor. The mentor
must have a current valid hunting approval, and must have completed a hunter
education course if born on or after January 1, 1973. The fee for hunting
approvals issued to youth ages 10 and 11 will be reduced. Visit the DNR website
or call 1-888-936-7463 for more information.

Anyone 12 years and older who graduates from a Wisconsin Hunter Education class
after January 1, 2009 for the first time may receive a free special Antlerless
Deer Carcass Tag. This carcass tag is valid for an antlerless deer in any DMU
during any open deer season with the appropriate license and corresponding
weapon. This tag is issued only through DNR offices that provide counter
service. This tag may not be used for group hunting.

Wisconsin deer hunting prohibits the use of dogs in order to hunt. A dog that
is actively engaged in a legal hunting activity, including training, is not
considered to be running at large if the dog is monitored or supervised by a
person and the dog is on land that is open to hunting or on land on which the
person has obtained permission to hunt or to train a dog.
    
Unless you are a Class C holder (visually handicapped permit owners), it is
illegal to use or possess laser sights while hunting. You are not allowed to
hunt with an automatic firearm, nor could you use any firearm to hunt a deer
within 100 yards of public, unless granted to do so on an individuals property.

It is illegal to sell, purchase, or barter any deer or deer part thereof
except: the head, skin not in spotted coat, and antlers not in velvet of any deer
lawfully killed, when severed from the rest of the carcass. It is unlawful to
possess a deer carcass unless tagged and registered as required. You are
allowed to transport another person’s unregistered deer only when accompanied
by the person issued the carcass tag. Once registered, anyone may transport the
deer.

Wisconsin deer hunting is very popular, at the same time, Wisconsin hunting
likes to maintain a level of respect between fellow hunters as well as for the
deer. One thing that is highly stressed is to not waste the game, and to not
torture it by having it die slowly. You must make every reasonable effort to
retrieve all game
killed or crippled. Until such effort is made, such game shall be included in
the
daily bag. This rule does not allow you to trespass without permission of the
landowner
nor shoot game beyond established shooting hours. Whether on a deer hunt, or
hitting a deer with your vehicle by accident, you must request a tag for the
carcass through the Sheriff’s Department.

As far as respect towards your fellow hunters, it is illegal to take someone
else’s  game without their consent… the chances of them giving you their
game when they are out on the hunt is highly likely though. Another compliance
which needs to be met is wearing a blazing orange color when going deer
hunting. Not only does it prevent you from being fired at by accident, but it
also takes away the suspense from fellow hunters if they feel a deer is
approaching.

All in all, Wisconsin likes to keep their hunting clean, after all… it’s a
sport. Even Internationally played sports have their own codes of conduct,
which are solely there to keep the game fair. The essence of that fairness is
implemented when these rules and regulations were created, in order to ensure
safety and fair play, Hunt on!

Ohio Hunting Laws

Ohio Hunting Laws

Ohio hunting offers an opportunity to for residence and non residence to engage in meaningful recreation with friends and family. Ohio hunting encourages all to explore the wildlife, however they do have specific regulations. Unless otherwise indicated people are allowed to hunt game using longbow, crossbow, or any caliber handgun, shot gun or airgun. It is important that the gun is not above a ten gauge.
Game birds are not allowed to be taken by trapping in Ohio hunting. Ohio also prohibits the use of electronic bird callers when hunting migratory birds who not central to a specifics state and therefore are protected under federal law. The same goes for wild turkey, deer and waterfowl.
Ohio hunting laws prohibit the use of a beam or light  thrust toward any animal during the hunting process. This regulation keeps both the hunter safe when hunting game. Long bows and cross bows may be used to catch legal game, and during youth deer season, deer gun season, and muzzle season, all hunters must wear orange hunter gear including coveralls, coats, jackets etc.
Ohio hunting prohibits the use of poisonous or explosive arrows that promote animal cruelty. Many organizations exist in Ohio that allow hunters to share the bounty. This division of Ohio hunting is dedicated to feeding the needy through an organization called FHFH (farmers and hunters feeding the hungry). 
An Ohio hunting license is necessary in order to hunt any game, and fishing. Ohio hunting license regulations require a hunter to fill out a temporary kill tag to the carcass of the killed animal that should be placed in the protective license holder.
The protective license holder is used to place the Ohio hunting license in at all times, and is not provided by the wildlife commission. The Ohio division of wildlife suggest that hunters carry licenses and permits in a protective pouch, or laminate them. Those not carrying their Ohio hunting license are not allowed to hunt but are allowed to carry the weapon in a concealed fashion. 
Ohio hunting is one of the only states that encourages women to get out and hunt. They way they do this is by providing a program called Becoming and Outdoor Woman which offers courses in various aspects of hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities.The specific aspects taught are shooting sports, hunting sports, bird watching, and more.
This program is offered on both a national and state wide level, and allows an industry usually offered to men now open to women. Ohio hunting as a whole is a great recreational activity that comes with an even greater responsibility.
All hunters are required to make their Ohio hunting license visible at all times which will decrease the chance that anyone will be engaging in unlawful activity. The state of Ohio does an excellent job of protecting their wildlife and allowing people to engage in hunting and fishing as sports. 

Oklahoma Hunting Laws

Oklahoma Hunting Laws

The Oklahoma hunting license is extremely important to the hunting experience in the state. Oklahoma does not receive state or federal tax money to support fish or wildlife.
Controlled hunts are conducted in the state in order to control a hunt that may be unsafe to do unsupervised, or if the Oklahoma hunting land that is sought after is inhabited by more animals than usual. Many time An Oklahoma hunting license given for a controlled hunt is given at random and is very limited. This makes the controlled hunt something highly applied for and competitive.
The categories for a controlled hunt include elk, antelope, deer, youth deer,raccoon, turkey, and quail hunts. The Oklahoma hunting license is used to fund the wildlife conservation of the state, as well as managing fishing and game across the state. There are over seven hundred places across the state that are licensed to sell a Oklahoma State license.
These places include, sports shops, bait shops, convenient stores, online, and by calling the wildlife hot-line. There is a three dollar convenience fee for purchasing a license online instead of purchasing it in one of the land locations. An Oklahoma hunting license is specific in price and description.
The Blue River Passport License requires that a hunter fish in an Oklahoma hunting land located on the Blue River. This license costs twenty one dollars. Unless a person possesses a combination or annual hunting and fishing license they are restricted to this specific area.
The Annual Hunting and Fishing License is issued to residence that are between the ages of eighteen and sixty four. This license costs forty two dollars. Individuals with this license are allowed to hunt all legal Oklahoma hunting land. The Waterfowl license is issued to all that are hunting migratory waterfowl. 
The Waterfowl license costs ten dollars, lasts only for a year and can be renewed at full price The Residential Elk License is given to those who hunt elk. This license is valid for only one elk and costs fifty one dollars to purchase. HIP is a license that is free but mandatory for all bird hunters and is used by those between the age of sixteen and sixty five.
The HIP is the known as the Harvest Information Permit and the only people exempt from obtaining this are those that are hunting on their property. A Residential Land Access licence costs forty dollars and is specific to the Oklahoma hunting land of Honobia Creek or the Three Rivers. Additionally, The 2010 NR Land Access License used for the same Oklahoma hunting land, is needed for non residents and costs eighty five dollars to obtain.
More expensive licenses are required in the state of Oklahoma when a hunter wants to hunt a bear, deer, turkey, fur, or elk when a hunter is a non resident. In fact, the NR or non resident regulations can cost anywhere from one hundred to three hundred dollars to obtain. In Oklahoma, since the Oklahoma hunting license funds all recreation and sport regarding their wildlife, the regulations for visitors are much higher.
The wildlife in Oklahoma is sought after often making the demand higher and thus the cost for non residence extremely high. Certain areas in Oklahoma are treated more important than others, however all of the hunting land is great. 

Oregon Hunting Laws

Oregon Hunting Laws

Oregon hunting offers people the opportunity to hunt one of the nations rarest game, the elk. Oregon is the home of the second largest elk herd in the nation housing over one hundred and four thousand elk.

Hunting in Oregon has become increasingly fun due to the increase of the states Mule Deer populations. They now topple over two hundred and forty five mule deer. The greatest part of hunting in Oregon is that hunters get to explore the Oregon Trail as well as the Rocky Mountains. Rifle and archery hunting in Oregon exists in the Rocky Mountains to those who are camping and are interested in guided tours.

Oregon hunting on the Rocky Mountains is usually conducted with the guidance of an instructor to ensure safety, infield preparation,and includes lodging and mails that are provided by the guides themselves. These types of controlled hunts are offered in Oregon to protect the hunter themselves and to ensure that hunting is being done properly. These types of hunts are often applied for and offered on a first come first serve basis and can be very limited.

Hunting in Oregon for elk, mule deer, and bears begins in August and last until December of each year. Each hunter who is hunting in Oregon whether resident or non resident must possess a valid hunting license and cannot posses more than one in a given year. These licenses last for the same amount of time as the hunting season itself. Any hunter possessing a licence permitting hunting in Oregon, is allowed to hunt in the islands or waters of the Snake Rivers where the boundary between Oregon and Idaho exists.

To hunt on the Oregon side or the Washington side the hunter must a have a valid license for the state in which they are hunting. In Oregon game bird hunters must possess a free HIP permit which is a harvest information program validation. This ensures that a hunter is aware of the proper procedure for hunting a particular animal. Depending on which bird a person is hunting, they must have waterfowl permit that is legal and valid for whichever animal they are hunting. 

Big game in Oregon hunting is caught using bow hunting. This type of Oregon hunting is widely popular and often involves competitions among hunters that fighter's the excitement of the sport. A magazine known as the Oregon hunters Association is an aspect of Oregon hunting that incorporates both experience and preparation that is associated with hunting itself.

This magazine offers pictures and contests that allow hunters to engage with one another as well as a list of all the new sites that people can use both alone and on guided tours. Hunting in Oregon is a sport that is very important to people of all ages. The activities that surround this support are extensive and many businesses have been created to accommodate this sport. Hunting is a part of the Oregon culture and offers an outdoors experienced like no other. If you need legal advice and assistance, contact Oregon lawyers.

 

Pennsylvania Hunting Laws

Pennsylvania Hunting Laws

Pennsylvania hunting is regulated by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The mission of this entity is to ensure that all wildlife species are protected and hunted in a legal manner. Pennsylvania offers a diverse selection of wildlife to hunt and also offers fishing on the Lake Erie.

The wildlife in the state of Pennsylvania is among the most diverse in the nation, and offers and abundance of activities for hunters and alike. Pennsylvania hunting of black bears is regulated within the state so that allow manually operated center-fire firearms, handguns, shotguns, with all lead bullets and or ball that are designed to expand on impact. It is important that these rifles are used to stay within regulation of Pennsylvania hunting laws.

Muzzle loads are allowed, as well as longbows. Specifically bow hunters must use arrows with broad heads to ensure that they expand on entry. Automatic and semi-automatic weapons are not allowed in the state of Pennsylvania. Additionally, any sight altering devices such as light devices are not permitted under Pennsylvania law

Pennsylvania licensing types are different and vary depending on what is being hunted. Adult hunting licenses are offered to residence of Pennsylvania between the ages of seventeen and sixty four.

This type of Pennsylvania hunting license can be used to hunt general game and birds that are not associated with any particular regulation. Junior residential licenses are issued to those who are under the age of seventeen and require that they are accompanied by an adult. These individual hunters must have completed a hunter-trapper education course and offer the opportunity to receive a combination license.

Combination licenses are given granting children the opportunity to engage in archery, muzzle shooting, and grant hunting. Pennsylvania hunting license regulations make specific license for archery, muzzle loading, bow hunting, and non residence. Non residence have to pay a higher fee to obtain a Pennsylvania hunting license. Additionally license for bear hunting and second spring gobbler seasons are acquired by a certain date and are higher for non residence than for residence of Pennsylvania.

The Resident DMAP Harvest Permit is a license that can be used for both general or combination hunting, and offers specific versions of itself for antler less deer, and alike. This same license for non residence is double in the price. A special Pennsylvania hunting license is know as one that requires a special drawing to obtain. This is used when hunters are searching for elk, or bobcats. Both are a Pennsylvania hunting license that allows only one of these animals are caught a year by the chosen hunters.

Pennsylvania hunting laws operate according to licensing and regulation. It is important to the state as a whole that they preserve the wildlife at all costs. To help protect wildlife hunters can first comply with the hunting laws of the state, and second volunteer to spread awareness about the crimes committed on wildlife. Additionally, when hunting people could report any unlawful hunting practices seen. It is the mission of the Pennsylvania Game Commission to protect the wildlife at all costs. 

 

Rhode Island Hunting Laws

Rhode Island Hunting Laws

The Department of Environmental Management offers regulatory procedures and guidance to residence and non residence that are interested in hunting and reserving wildlife. The general hunting law in the state of Rhode Island are guided by specific permits or licenses that a hunter must obtain.
The All Outdoors Package Permit allows a hunter to take up to twelve deer during the deer hunting season, archers are only allowed six, muzzle holders and those with shot guns only are allowed four, and six antler less deer. The deer that have antlers are more protected than those without them.
Hunting rules allow for hunters to earn what is known as a bucket permit. This permit allows an archer to take one additional deer. Hunting rules in Rhode Island do not require the hunters to wear orange suites like most other states due. Animals that can be hunted in accordance to hunting rules include, antler less deer, bearded turkeys, migratory birds, and sea life for fishing. 
Hunting law in Rhode Island is regulated by what is called the Lacey Act of nineteen ninety, is the first game law. It’s job is to regulate interstate and international wildlife conservation. The term wildlife refers to wild birds,amphibians, reptiles, mollusk, crustacean, or their dead bodies, arts, eggs. or offspring.
The hunting rules of this act are meant to protect the animal life itself. This act does not include migratory birds which are protected under another act known as the Migratory Bird Act. This act was signed in nineteen eighteen and is used to protects any migratory bird under federal law. This was agreed upon between the United States, Great Britain, Mexico, Japan, and Russia. 
Hunting laws under Rhode Island state law prohibit the removal of any reptile or amphibian from the wild for any reason. This is a way that the  state protects the life of small animals, and big ones as well that are often not respected by residences. Hunting rules regulate the bag limits for small game such as, red foxes, gray foxes, gray squirrels, cotton tail rabbits, hare, ruffed goose, quail, pheasant, junior pheasant, and raccoon.
Hunting law for these animals range from one to five of each animal daily. Te only exception is that of the red and gray foxes which are zero, and the Raccoon which is unlimited. Hunting rules for migratory game include, dove, rails, snipe, woodchuck, crow, Canadian goose, and sea duck. The limits for these animals are specific and change due to the rarity of all of these birds.
Coyote hunting lasts from September through February, and hunting rules require that hunters possess both coyote and wild turkey permits in order to hunt. Wild turkey hunting season lasts from April to May for spring gobblers, junior, and paraplegic turkey hunting. Hunting rules regulate archery, and it lasts from the Beginning of September until the end. Hunting law in Rhode Island is not extensive as in other states, and mostly small game is hunted. However, hunting does occur, and it is vital to the Department of Environmental Management that wildlife is protected. 

South Carolina Hunting Laws

South Carolina Hunting Laws

South Carolina’s hunting laws are among the most liberal in the United States. South Carolina has little prohibition on handguns. South Carolina only requires citizens to carry a permit if owners choose to carry a concealed handgun. Gun statistics show that most South Carolina residents purchase their firearms for the purpose of hunting.
South Carolina allows for the purchase of all weapons except for fully automatic guns. Semi-automatic weapons that are not military grade weapons can purchased by South Carolina Residents and non-residents who own property in South Carolina. Lenient Gun laws however, do not mean that proper hunting practices should not be observed.
South Carolina’s hunting laws protect the following wild game animals by regulating hunting seasons for specific types of animal. The animals protected under the South Carolina’s hunting laws are bears, turkeys, beaver, bobcat, weasel, waterfowl, mink, and snipe. It is prohibited to shoot and kill eagles, hawks, owls, and vultures and other birds of prey. 
South Carolina’s hunting laws prohibit the use of unethical methods of hunting. It is unlawful to perform a field trial without the proper permit. Field trials are when hunters release many dogs to compete for game. Hunting by crossbow is illegal on public hunting grounds. It is legal on private hunting grounds. Crossbows may only be used on deer, bears, and turkey.  Falconers must possess a permit from the South Carolina Divisions of Natural Resources.
Alligators may be hunted with permit from the South Carolina Division of Natural Resources. The hunter must be at least sixteen years old when hunting alligator. The permit only allows for the killing of one alligator. Armadillos also require a permit to hunt despite the animal not having protected status. Bears may also be hunted only during bear season. It is unlawful to trade or sell bear carcasses or parts of bear carcasses. It is unlawful to transfer a bear during the off-season. All freshly killed bears must be reported to the South Carolina Division of Natural Resources within 24 hours of killing the bear.
Deer are protected animals. Hunting is only permitted during season. Certain Wildlife Management Zones do not allow the hunting of deer with the aid of dogs. The species of deer that inhabit the woodlands of South Carolina are White- tailed deer. Gun statistics show that deer hunting in South Carolina is one of the most ethical due to the Division of Natural Resources’ studies on the equipment South Carolina hunters use to kill deer. The average distance at which South Carolina hunters shoot deer is 132 yards with an 81% percent success rate. One out of two deer ran after being shot.
The recovery rate of deer carcasses that ran after being shot was greatly increased with the aid of dogs. Hunters who used dogs were 20% more likely to find deer. Gun statistics show to increased efficiency in hunters that used high caliber firearms. Gun statistics also show that deer ran less frequently when hunters used soft point ammunition like ballistic tip or bronze tip rounds. Therefore, the use of full metal jacket rounds and other hard tipped rounds was found unnecessary.
However, deer ran less frequency when hunters implemented a high caliber rifle. These studies stopped South Carolina from adopting caliber restrictions for most forms of hunting. South Carolina has the least restrictions on the type of ammunition and caliber of hunting firearms. Trapping, poisoning, and automatic weapons are still illegal though as these are extremely unethical hunting practices.

South Dakota Hunting Laws

South Dakota Hunting Laws

South Dakota has one of the strongest hunting traditions and therefore some of the most lenient state gun laws in the country. With approximately 17% of the population over the age of 18 legally registered to hunt, South Dakota is a state that is very friendly to the sport of hunting. Because hunting is so popular, South Dakota law on guns is among the most lenient in the country.

Citizens may choose to carry a concealed handgun on their person with a permit. Hunting in South Dakota is vital to the state's economy with over $275 million in state revenue from hunting related expenses like gun sales, equipment, licenses, and permits in 2004. South Dakota is home to 7 different gun companies hand producing premium hunting firearms and handguns annually.

To maintain the vitality of the South Dakota's large hunting economy and culture, conservationists, lawmakers, and hunters have worked together to create hunting legislation that promotes ecological sustainability. Hunters cannot use permanent tree stands to hunt big game on public hunting lands.

No turkeys may be shot while in trees or roosts. Lead shot is legal ammunition to shoot turkeys in South Dakota. However, the use of non-toxic shot is required on all public hunting lands.  The use of night vision equipment or artificial lights to hunt animals is also illegal. The shining of a beam of artificial light at a game animal give hunters unfair advantage and is thus an unsustainable practice.

Hunting with lights is only legal in the case of hunting raccoons and badgers but are only to be used after a dog has chased them up a tree. Hunting Dogs in South Dakota must have all their vaccinations and other shots up to date and checked by a veterinarian. Electronic animal calls are not to be used to attract migratory birds as this gives hunters an unfair advantage with the exception of crows. This law also applies to all species of big game, including turkey. Taking game must only done with a firearm, bow and arrow, or by falconry. All other methods of hunting are illegal.

South Dakota hunting legislation also promotes safety and respectful human interaction. It is illegal to hunt on Native American Reservations as the sovereignty of tribal lands is to be respected by all. The use of motor vehicles on public hunting lands is prohibited except on designated roads and parking lots. The shooting of game from a moving vehicle is against the law on public hunting grounds in the state of South Dakota.

Harassment of hunters who show intent of lawfully taking and harvesting game is against the law. South Dakota is encourages all citizens to turn in poachers in the State. South Dakota has a zero tolerance policy against poaching; poaching is the act of illegally hunting on private property without permission. South Dakota made 183 poaching arrests in 2008 with total fines over 25,000 and over 1,000 total days of jail-time.

South Dakota is yet another state where hunting legislation serves the interests of both hunters and environmentalists in a harmonious matter. South Dakota's hunting legislation also institutionalizes the state's long tradition of hunting that dates back to the 19th century days of being an open frontier. Hunting and ecological conservation is not conflict of interest as many allege. South Dakota has some of the fewest endangered game species as a result of reasonable hunting legislation.

 

District of Columbia Hunting Laws

District of Columbia Hunting Laws

DC has the strictest gun control laws. The 1975 Firearms Control and Regulation Act requires that all firearms must be registered. If the gun was registered before 1975 the law does not apply. The 2008 Supreme Court Case, District of Columbia v. Heller, stated that the city’s ban on firearms as unconstitutional.
DC residents may possess weapons purchased legally and secured safely in their houses. Most Washington DC residents who are hunters must travel outside of the City to hunting. Hunting of any animal is illegal in the District of Columbia, therefore most hunters go on hunting trips to rural counties of Maryland and Virginia. Refer to the hunting laws of Maryland and Virginia for additional information on hunting for DC residents.
Possession of a firearm while is vehicle must be unloaded and contained safely in the trunk while in transport, provision of DC legislation is referred to as peaceable journey. This provision allows hunters to go on hunting trips outside of the jurisdiction of the District of Columbia. Hunters also lease hunting lands outside of the DC metro area.
Hunting leases are privately owned land that are rented out to hunters. Other hunters go on hunting trips to public hunting grounds in State Parks on designated hunting grounds. All hunters who are residents of Washington, DC must follow the hunting legislation of the locality in which a hunter is hunting.