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Reform Movements and Ideas Background At A Glance

Reform Movements and Ideas Background At A Glance The 2007 Virginia Tech
shooting has prompted many calls for re-examination of gun reform. The gun
reform movement is not limited to attempts to enforce gun control. Some
proponents of gun rights argued that the severity of the incident could have
been reduced if not for prohibitions preventing individuals from owning guns.
The Virginia Tech shootings were just the latest impetus behind the gun reform
movement.
   
The trend within recent American history has been for a renewed push towards
gun reform from both liberals and conservatives in the wake of tragedies. These
politicians seek to politicize the tragic event in an attempt to pass or repeal
legislation with which they do not agree. Liberal politicians are often
advocates for tighter gun control legislation. President Bill Clinton supported
the passage of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act. This bill, which had
support among liberals and some conservatives instituted federal background
checks on firearm purchases within the United States. The Brady Bill

   
Gun reform is one of the most active political lobbies. The most active
lobbyists for gun rights is the NRAgun rights


Quick Reform Movements and Ideas Overview

Quick Reform Movements and Ideas Overview

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence is a gun reform organization that has had several names but one purpose: restricting the availability of guns. It achieved a modicum of success when it advocated for the passage of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act in 1993. It was also instrumental in the passage of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban. As a result of the successful efforts by Sarah Brady, wife of Jim Brady who was injured in an assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, the organization was renamed in their honor.

Corporate Resistance to Gun Reform At A Glance

What You Should Know About The Criticisms TC

What You Should Know About The Criticisms TC

In the past the Brady Campaign has come out against so-called “plastic guns.” Plastic guns are a theoretical weapon containing no metal parts, and so would be undetectable when passing through a metal detector. Gun rights group point out however that the technology does not exist to create these weapons, making the Brady Campaign’s anti gun advocacy on this front spurious.
Sarah Brady, the head of the Brady Campaign when the Brady Bill named for her husband was passed by the Congress, attracted controversy for a gun she purchased for her son at a gun sale. Critics accuse this anti gun advocate of making a “straw” purchase.
A straw purchase is when a person who is able to pass a background check to purchase a gun buys a gun for an individual who would be prohibited from doing so. Sarah Brady’s supporters, however claim that she did not violate the law because there is a provision allowing guns to be purchased for family members, as well as because her son is permitted to purchase guns in his own name.

Understanding Brady Bill Criticisms

Understanding Brady Bill Criticisms

The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as , has drawn a great deal of criticism on a variety of fronts. The bill was originally proposed in Congress in 1987. Anti gun forces, lead by the were able to arouse a successful campaign which resulted in the bill being defeated in committee.  Their gun rights argument cost them millions of dollars to present to the public and to the individual members of Congress.
By the time law makers were able to reach a consensus and pass the bill in 1993, gun rights advocates had been able to wring one important concession from lawmakers. In 1998 the mandatory five day waiting period would cease to be a component of the bill. Instead the coalition, which saw the bill as anti gun, convinced law makers to create a federal system of instant computerized background checks.
Immediately after the signing of the bill, the NRA commenced a public relations campaign to paint the bill as anti gun, as well as unconstitutional and a violation of the gun rights of every American. The NRA supported lawsuits filed in Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Texas, Vermont and Wyoming. These states could hardly be construed as being anti gun, and as such it was believed that arguments appealing to gun rights would be especially appealing and have a higher chance of success.
The gun rights lobby sought to have the Brady Bill declared unconstitutional. The Supreme Court eventually took up the case in Printz versus United States. The NRA led the effort to paint what they considered to be anti gun legislature as a violation of the Tenth Amendment because it was a federal statute forcing state and local governments to take action and conduct background tests. Under a precedence established five years earlier, the court ruled that states can not be forced to do anything due to federal laws, except under very specific circumstances.
The court found that the Brady Bill did not meet those standards. The Amicus Curiae brief, or Friend of the Court brief, filed by the NRA argued because the bill compelled action by state officials, the entire statute must be invalidated. When deciding the case in 1997 the Court quieted the substance of the gun rights objections. While it agreed it was unconstitutional to compel action by local officials, officials were able to do so if they so chose. These objections became less relevant once the federal background checks went into effect.
After the Supreme Court ruling, claims that the bill was anti gun faded among the gun rights movement. Gun rights arguments have been more focused on painting individual state ordinances as anti gun, as well as preventing other bills from being passed. The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act has not received much attention in recent years.

Goals and Objectives At A Glance

Goals and Objectives At A Glance

There are two gun control solutions that the Brady Center was able to accomplish. The first was the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill 
Although a president of a precursor to the Brady Coalition stated that a long-term goal of the organization was a ban on handgun ownership, later statements published on the website of the Brady Campaign said that “The Brady Campaign, the Million Mom March and the Brady Center believe that a safer America can be achieved without banning all guns.”

Quick Overview On The Goals and Objectives Of the Brady Bill

Quick Overview On The Goals and Objectives Of the Brady Bill

The gun control solutions in effect at the time would not have, according to Sarah Brady, prevented John Hinckley Jr from obtaining the weapon which he fired in a failed attempt to assassinate Ronald Reagan. Inadequate gun control at the time was said to be responsible for the injuries sustained in Hinckley’s attack by Reagan’s press secretary Jim Brady, Secret Service agent Tim McCarthy, and District of Columbia police officer Thomas Delehanty. The gun control solutions provided in the Brady Bill would have supposedly prevented Hinckley from attaining the gun because he had violated a federal law.