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What You Should Know About Fingerprinting Payment and License Issuance

What You Should Know About Fingerprinting Payment and License Issuance

Obtaining a firearms license is a very non-uniform task, as each state has different regulations. Generally, a firearms license will be issued from your state’s police force, or perhaps more directly from your county’s police force. But the exact requirements you will have to fulfill in order to get your license can often vary, as can the rules on when you have to get the license, compared to when you buy the gun, and the rules on whether or not you must be fingerprinted by the police.
These rules are all very variable; the best way to determine your state’s particular set of firearms laws is to ask at a gun store, where the staff will be more than likely to know the answers to all of your questions. Another good source of information on the path to obtaining your firearms license would be the website for your state police force, as it will likely contain relevant information there.
For states whose firearms laws do not require individuals to obtain licenses for the purchase of a given firearm, there will obviously be no additional fee for seeking the license. But for those states that do require permits, there may often be a fee, though it will likely not be much higher than $20 or so.
This will need to be sent in along with the application and any other requisite information, such as proof of completion of a firearms training course, or proof of fingerprinting, which you will have had to complete beforehand. Fingerprinting can be done at your local law enforcement agency, if it is necessary. Nowadays, however, background checks performed at the gun store itself can often eliminate the need for fingerprinting, as these background checks rely on an FBI database and occur at very high speeds.
As some general tips, it is a good idea not to actually purchase a gun at either a gun store, or online, until you have received your firearms license. The firearms license might not actually arrive at your home for some time after you complete all the necessary requirements of firearms laws, as there may be a waiting period of up to 30 days for any given state upon your application for a license. But it will always be safer to get your firearms license prior to buying the firearm, as generally you will have no longer than two weeks to obtain a firearms license after purchasing a firearm.
Again, the best possible way to be sure of your state’s particular firearms laws concerning fingerprinting and payment is to attempt to find out from your state’s law enforcement agencies, either directly or online. These sources are the most likely to have all the pertinent information, and to be able to guide you through the process.
Gun stores are a good secondary option, as they will also likely have the necessary information, but the application will have to be submitted to law enforcement anyway, so you might as well go there for your information.

Your Guide to Firearms Safety Course

Your Guide to Firearms Safety Course

In some states firearm laws stipulate that, as a requirement for buying a gun, or just for carrying a concealed weapon, you have to pass a test proving your proficiency with and knowledge of guns. Most times, passing these tests will require attending a course on firearms safety, providing information especially on issues of carrying a concealed weapon.
But even if you do not plan on seeking a concealed carry permit, attending such a safety course could only be a good idea if you are planning on buying a gun. Firearm laws may not require you to undergo such a course if you plan on only buying a gun which is otherwise non-restricted, but again, the usefulness of knowledge garnered from such a course could prove invaluable.
Whatever course you choose to take, you should be certain that it is approved and certified by the government, as any other course may not provide the information you might require under firearm laws. These courses can generally be found easily by asking at your local gun store, as you get a new gun. It is also likely that you can find such courses by checking in with the county sheriff’s office, or by searching online.
Insofar as CCW (carrying a concealed weapon) courses are concerned, the primary focus will be on covering firearm laws concerning liability, such that the person buying the gun will come to understand the dangers inherent to carrying it concealed. Some courses may have a component in which the trainee will be required to fire and clean the gun, proving his or her proficiency with the weapon.
As the CCW training courses are often single day affairs in which the individual buying a gun is both instructed and tested on the same day, even a person who is relatively new to guns should not encounter great difficulty with this course. Even should someone fail to pass the standards set by firearms law, and therefore not complete the test, then one could always take the test and course again at a later point.
Another good source for finding a firearms safety course that will be both effective, and will comply with your state’s firearm laws, is with the National Rifle Association. On NRAHQ.org, you can find a tool that will point you towards training courses in your area, allowing you to find the right resource for your own level of experience, and for satisfying any requirements you might need to complete in the process of buying a gun.
Their training courses can also ensure that you become proficient with your firearm, so that perhaps you can get more value out of buying a gun then mere defense, as you learn to target shoot and begin to enjoy it, which will also ensure that you are well-equipped to take care of your own weapon.
The NRA website also provides a good resource for basic rules that should always be followed, and should be taught in any gun training course. These include such important tips as keeping the gun pointed in a safe direction, keeping your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot, keeping the gun unloaded until ready to use.
Regardless of whether or not a firearms safety course is required under your state’s firearm laws, if you are buying a gun then it is always a good idea to schedule yourself for such a course.

Understanding Background Check

Understanding Background Check

Gun law varies in every state for the individual, personal owner. Some states have very little regulation on obtaining a gun license; others will require you to go through a lengthy process of obtaining a gun license. But there are certain individuals for whom it would be impossible to obtain a gun license. Prohibitions on these individuals’ opportunities to obtain a gun license come from the federal level, primarily through the Gun Control Act of 1968, and enforced further by the Brady Handgun Violence Protection Act of 1993. These individuals include convicted felons, fugitives from justice, and those with severe mental defects.
In order to determine what individuals do fall subject to these conditions, the Brady Act provides for the use of NICS, an FBI database, to perform quick and efficient background checks on all potential gun purchasers. Sometimes, these background checks might run for three days, but most often they take place over the duration of a single phone call. If the background check does not come back with a denial within those three days, then the gun purchase may be completed anyway. Thus, the backgrounds checks are an easy, unobtrusive way to ensure that those individuals who assuredly should not be allowed to purchase a gun, are in fact prevented from doing so.
The NRA opposed the background checks initially described by the Brady Act, as the NICS database was not functional yet. The organization actually sued to have the Brady Act changed, such that background checks were not required to be performed by local law enforcement. Though the change was in fact made to the Brady Act, most local law enforcement officers still performed the checks, until the NICS database came online. Now, such background checks are quick, easy, and painless, and are routinely performed with every gun purchase.
For those who would seek a federal gun license, of course, there is an entirely different, more intensive procedure to be followed. A federal firearms license differs from the state granted license that permits one to carry a firearm. These state licenses do not necessarily carry over from state to state; but a federal firearms license is a license from the entire country of America, and is specifically oriented towards those who wish to sell or build guns. In other words, a federal firearms license is not needed for the average gun owner; it is only necessary for those who wish to sell guns, or who wish to work on guns. The background check required for receiving a federal gun license is similar to that required for owning a firearm, period, but the certification process requires other elements, such as the would-be licensee proving that he or she has adequate, safe storage facilities for the materials in question, and has notified law enforcement as to the location and nature of this site.
Regardless of whether you are applying for a federal gun license or a state gun permit, however, you can rest assured that the background check system of America today is quick, easy, and effective at ensuring that those who should not be sold guns are prevented from buying them.

Gun Laws Background Overview

Gun Laws Background Overview

For the would-be gun owner, determining the laws about obtaining a gun license in his or her state is the first step. While there are certain federal statutes that will have an impact on obtaining a gun license, no matter where you may call home, each state has its own particular laws concerning gun licenses and how often they are issued. Some states require a purchaser to obtain a license to carry a gun for all possible weapons that he or she might buy, for example; others only require purchasers to obtain a gun license for certain types of weapons, such as long-guns, or handguns.
Beyond this, the usage of the gun will also likely determine if or what kind of gun license you might need to obtain. The most common example of this kind of specialized permit would be a gun license for a concealed carry weapon, allowing you to carry your handgun in a concealed fashion. Again, each state deals with this kind of gun license under its own specific and unique statutes, and therefore, the issue needs to be examined for the state in question, and not just in general.
The federal laws that do matter to those seeking a gun license are relatively few in number, but great in significance. Most obviously, of course, is the 2nd Amendment, which guarantees the right to bear arms. But beyond that, the Gun Control Act of 1968 is likely the single most important piece of legislation to consider, as it prohibits certain individuals from obtaining a license to carry a gun entirely. Some of those who would be unable to get a gun license from the government as a result of the Gun Control Act include those who have renounced citizenship to the United States; convicted felons; unlawful drug users; and those with major mental defects.
For those with an interest in getting a license to carry a gun of a somewhat more intense variety, the Federal Assault Weapons Ban has become defunct, as of 2004, as the ban was originally only instituted for 10 years. New York still has a ban on assault weapons, meaning that even though the federal law has become defunct, New Yorkers would still be prohibited from obtaining a gun license for assault weapons. But for the rest of the country, as long as no new assault weapon ban is enacted, they remain viable options for those with a license to carry a gun, though it is possible that the state may have some additional measures which the assault weapon purchaser would have to deal with. There are also a number of proposed laws which would reenact the ban and make it impossible for anyone throughout the country to obtain a gun license for assault weapons, though none of these new bills have passed as of yet.
So, in sum, for those with an interest in obtaining a license to carry a gun, in general the best immediate route is to check your state’s statutes, as no federal statutes on gun licensing have ever been successfully passed. But you should also keep in mind exactly what gun you are intending to purchase, and for what reason; a gun purchased for self-defense will likely require a concealed carry permit, as well as a gun license, and therefore will be more difficult to obtain than just a gun which you plan to use only for hunting.

What You Need to Know About Handgun Carry Permits

What You Need to Know About Handgun Carry Permits

Handguns often fall under a different set of laws than other guns, such as rifles or shotguns, because of the inherent danger in the smaller weapons. While they are less powerful than their larger counterparts, handguns are instead easier to conceal, and therefore present more of a danger than guns which can be easily recognized and avoided or dealt with. As a result, many states have specific handgun laws, and even may require handgun purchasers to obtain a handgun permit in order to keep those handguns.
These handgun permits oft times are related to the simple ownership and purchase of the gun, but other times are more oriented on the concealed carry of handguns which makes them so dangerous. Having a handgun permit for one may not be the same as having a permit for the other.
As an example of this, New Jersey requires citizens to first obtain a lifetime Firearm Purchaser permit, before obtaining any weapon. But then it requires citizens to get a special handgun permit, above and beyond the Firearms Purchaser permit, if they intend to get a handgun. Above and beyond this, New Jersey’s handgun laws are such that it is essentially nigh impossible for any given individual to obtain a concealed carry permit.
Such a handgun permit would be granted to those for whom carrying a gun is a necessary function of earning a living, working a job, but for those who do not require a handgun to perform their job, New Jersey’s handgun laws make it practically impossible, or at the very least, highly difficult, to obtain such a permit.
In Alabama, however, handgun laws are very different. In Alabama, while there is no handgun permit required to simply purchase a handgun (or any other gun, for that matter), a handgun permit is required to carry the weapon concealed. This concealed carry handgun permit is much more easily attainable than is New Jersey’s, however, as one simply need submit an application to the county sheriff and have it be approved.
As yet another example of a different variation on state handgun laws, Michigan’s handgun laws allow for handgun owners to obtain a handgun permit for a concealed carry, but only if the individual satisfies a number of other requirements, including that he or she is 21, that he or she has not been found guilty or accused of certain felonies or misdemeanors within a certain time period, and that he or she has fulfilled a firearms training course officially approved by the state.
Even with a concealed carry handgun permit, however, individuals are restricted from carrying a concealed weapon on certain locations, such as schools, and Michigan handgun laws even require those who carry concealed handguns to immediately inform police officers of this fact if they are stopped.
Regardless of what state you live in, it is fairly safe to assume that carrying a concealed handgun will, under your state’s handgun laws, require some form of permit. Even in those states which are deemed “shall issue,” such as Alabama, permits are still required, though they are easy enough to obtain. It is entirely possible that such handgun permits will not be offered in your state, however, so be prepared for this eventuality.